What is lock snapping?

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by Bodgeitandleggit, 26 Feb 2012.

  1. masona

    masona

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    Always a solid wooden door for me, however I did it for experiencing, I have made someone a 22mm copper pipe length from the door handle to the floor and a T-piece which slide over the door handle to stop the handle operating, have tried it myself to open the door from outside with the door unlock and I couldn't open it, sometime a simple idea can be effective! Have fitted many upvc doors and locks, I can break into them quietly without making too much noise and that's not bumping the locks :cry: Not sure about the latest upvc doors or any improvement
     
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  3. Alarm

    Alarm

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  4. skyboy

    skyboy

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    I have replaced many many locks that were potentially vunerable to snapping.
    That £250k house you bought has a £10 lock on the patio door...

    Every new home should have anti snap as standard.
    Fitted an alarm to a home last week where thieves had attempted to break in via their patio door , fortunately they had an anti snap lock and the intruders failed to get in.
    They now have an alarm that will phone their mobile if someone gets in and they are in Scotland as they were when the previous attempt was made.

    Anyway - lock snapping - it's bad news and it really happens but is fortunately cheap to avoid.
     
  5. Bodgeitandleggit

    Bodgeitandleggit

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    I started this thread only after hearing about it, although I live in a area with very little crime rate I changed mine with the help of some of the guys on here and it was really easy......so thanks guys
     
  6. pred

    pred

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    I'll stick to my nail bars thanks. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: a neighbour asked if he could borrow a sledge hammer a few years back, he had locked himself out, i went over with two nail bars and the only damage i did was to rip half a dozen screws out of the wooden frame that a security bolt was attached to.
     
  7. AssociatedAlarm

    AssociatedAlarm

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    As before PHYSICAL security is the first priority.

    The Master locksmiths Association (MLA). Now known as BLI (British Locksmiths Institute) if you joined later and a few other items. Have this guide you can check and also see if your locks meet insurance requirements.
    Be aware there will be many price differences between companies. And some will be using others to make theirs (Strange one I know , but so is life).
    Anyway.

    http://www.gmp.police.uk/mainsite/0/DE96135F8DA6F7998025775000350F43/$file/Guidelinesforsecurity.pdf

    They also give suitable non kitemarked locks that can be used.

    Remember anti bump and anti snap should always be used on cylinder locks. The cylinder length being as small as possible so there is little protrusion from the door.
     
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  9. skyboy

    skyboy

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    I have always wondered why the eurocylinders on patio doors actually go through and are double keyed. The outside key must be redundant 99% of the time. In fact if you get an anti snap lock you may as well break the sacrificial part off before you even fit it.
     
  10. JohnD

    JohnD

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  11. skyboy

    skyboy

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    You don't have to scratch far under the security industry surface to find out there are a lot of dubious relationships within it.

    The Police and ACPO and their role. The positions taken by many ex police officers and the way work is handed out and presentation to the public is made. The relationships between security companies and charities and the police.

    Then there are the certifying bodies. There are so many conflicting interests it is actually quite depressing.

    The one industry you would expect integrity as a given and you certainly don't get it.

    All the alarms ever fitted could have been made to work perfectly well had they been correctly installed and maintained, except those specifications surprisingly are now defunct. Any alarm now installed before 2002 wont meet the current brief.
    There's a load of replacement work then..

    I won't bore you with any more examples but I lost any respect I ever had for the police when I uncovered their relationship with a local charitible status company.

    It was enough to make anyone vomit and the laughable bit was they claimed the organisation was set up to stop people being fleeced by cowboys and in reality they were the ones selling the snake oil.
     
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  12. AssociatedAlarm

    AssociatedAlarm

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    JD the Chubb 114 does. Read the page properly.

    Door locks certified to BS 3621:2004
    3G114 2 ½” & 3” 5 Lever Mortice Deadlock
    3G114E 2 ½” & 3” 5 Lever Mortice Deadlock
    3G114ERKS 2 ½”& 3” 5 Lever Mortice Deadlock
    3G114RKS 2 ½” & 3” 5 Lever Mortice Deadlock
    All versions as you can see.


    Appendix F Page 22
    3G110+
    3G135
    3M50 {For sliding doors
    3M51 {
    3K70
    3J60
    3C10 {With cylinders meeting the requirements of
    3C20 {BS EN 1303 Security Grade 4 & 3CE
    Escutcheons}}
    Are acceptable alternatives.
     
  13. JohnD

    JohnD

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    read what I wrote.

    Then look at page 16 of the document you appended

    Look at section C

    If you can't see that it includes in the list 3G110 and 3G114 you must be blind as well as stupid.

    If you don't know the difference between a 3G114 and the 3G114E you must be ignorant as well.

    The 3G114 is still made, but no longer meets the British Standard due to its 14mm bolt throw. So it should not now be included in a published document. The 3G114E has a 20mm bolt throw, as well as different levers and thrower.
     
  14. AssociatedAlarm

    AssociatedAlarm

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    It is indeed in the incorrect position, I made an error. Sorry. Whoever made the form has only read the 3621 designation.

    I have had another look and most seems in order. I have sent a email to the MLA/BLI with this error and will probably get told what I also just noticed.
    And that it is Edition 4 01.07.07 and has probably been updated by now.
    Hence the time taken to reply back. So my error also for a out of date ( although could still be valid, I will know by reply) document.
    With so many contributors it can take time for these updates.

    Again many thanks for the heads up.
     
  15. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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