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What type of Eave is this?

Discussion in 'Roofing and Guttering' started by htfix, 2 Sep 2019.

  1. htfix

    htfix

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    Hi,

    We need to get some verge work done for our roof but I want to understand the construction of our roof so I can understand what work is possible to do.

    Looking at photos of eaves online to compare, my roof seems to differ. The eave looks like a flush eave because the rafter appears to stop at the edge of the wall. Then there is a wooden overhang added which I can't work out how it's attached.

    There seems to be no undercloak running down to the end of the eave so no wonder the cemented verge just fell away.

    Can someone explain if this type of roof design is common and if indeed the undercloak should run all the way to the end of this eave.

    Many thanks,

    HT
     

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  2. Leofric

    Leofric

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    :eek:Common as muck -sorry .
    Can't quite understand what is happening there - looks like what they call a bit of a cock up in the building trade. The bargeboard has been stuck on the wall and rendered over , instead of being set off the face of the wall on a gable ladder , and I can't see any rafter feet supporting the fascia ,and as you say there is no undercloak to support the mortar verge pointing under the bottom tile.
     
  3. 23vc

    23vc

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    The rendered “bargeboard” could be an oversailing brick course, particularly as the remaining exposed bit of fascia seems to abut it.
     
  4. catlad

    catlad

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    Looks a bit old to have a gable ladder to me? Looks like the last rafter has been rendered over which is better than it being left exposed. It may have been a slate roof originally with a larger barge board nailed over the end rafter.
     
  5. bobasd

    bobasd

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    how would you see rafter feet in a boxed soffit?

    OP,
    do you understand the difference between a Barge Board and a rafter?
    That is not a "flush eave". Its a "boxed soffit eave".
    Have you been in the loft, and been able to see "the rafters stopping at the edge of the wall""?

    OP, are you aware of the disconnected RWP?

    OP, is there felt under the battens, and does it lead into the gutter?
    Could be you need the fascia and soffit stripping off and the first two courses of tiles lifted to expose whatever is going on behind the fascia?
    The exposed eaves boxing looks to be perished.
    Similar, from what can be seen, the verge might need stripping back at leat one line of verge tiles.
    I agree with catlad that it was previously a slate roof.
     
  6. Leofric

    Leofric

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    I wasn't seeing a boxed eaves with horizontal soffit , doesn't it look like a sloping soffit :?:Look how far the fascia board projects down below the soffit.
    not sure who you are asking, but I do ?
    It doesn't look to have a gable ladder but how old would it need to be to have a gable ladder :?:
     
  7. catlad

    catlad

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    It doesn't look to have a gable ladder but how old would it need to be to have a gable ladder :?:[/QUOTE]
    Anything with purlins wall plate & ridge would not require a gable ladder.
     
  8. Leofric

    Leofric

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    yes, bargeboards supported on purlins carried through wall but :-
    makes more sense seeing as it is rendered.
    There must be exposed rafter feet supporting the fascia ,if we could see a photo looking further along the eaves. If that is so, it would be a case of 'tidying up' the gable end with an undercloak to support mortar verge pointing under the bottom tile.(and connecting the rwp )
     
  9. catlad

    catlad

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    The end rafter maybe something like a 6x2" to help fix it to the purlin and the ridge, where ass the rest might be 3x2"
     
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