What type of paint & brush gives best results on Skirting & architrave

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I had already bought some Leyland quick drying water based gloss quite a while ago and it's still wrapped (not in the Christmas or birthday sort of way) yet I can't remember why I chose it. I think it's because someone stated the 'water based' gloss behaves more like a satin finish, which I think is the effect I want.

After watching multiple YouTube videos, I'm wondering if quick drying paint is not a good idea if you don't want to have brush marks as it starts to pull too early.
I don't know if that is subjective but it made me realise that not only do I need to decide if I want gloss or satin but what type of paint is easier to work with vertically and leaves the smoothest finish.

Firstly would I be right in saying that gloss makes imperfections stand out more than either eggshell or satin?
I personally would like a bit of shine but I'm worried about imperfections showing up. I guess the solution to that would be to prep the wood better.

On some of these YouTube videos albeit from the USA, many rave about pouring in some 'extender' into the paint as it 'levels' the paint more thus leaving brushless marks. Does anyone use or recommend this stuff?

Without breaking the bank, what type of paint and paintbrush can be recommended to get the best finish? The colour will be white and I'm not bothered about quick drying. The only reason I chose water based was because it is said that it won't yellow over time unlike an oil based one.

Thanks very much.
 
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water based paint doesnt flow out very well -laying off is a technique used to help leave a flat surface without noticeable brush strokes but it doesnt work well with water based paint

You could try a hybrid paint which is waterbased but has an oil carrier -like Johnstones aqua

or you could add floetrol paint conditioner
 
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If you want a high gloss finish, surface preparation (sanding, knot filling, priming, sanding, undercoat, sanding, gloss) is the way to go. Personally don't like water based gloss paint, it always looks a bit cheap.
 
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If you want a high gloss finish, surface preparation (sanding, knot filling, priming, sanding, undercoat, sanding, gloss) is the way to go. Personally don't like water based gloss paint, it always looks a bit cheap.

What grit level would you go for the sanding after primer and undercoat layers.

I assume you mean just a very light sand to smooth it off?
 
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80grit to level and key the surface. The finest (highest number) grit Decorators abrasive paper you can find between costs (I use old, worn sandpaper) to de-ni
 
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No more gloss, no more oil based paints. No hybrids.

Roller wherever possible, otherwise brush.

I use Leyland Acrylic undercoat primer and finish with Dulux Satinwod paint

Sand with 60 grit, fill holes, sand with 120 grit, prime and paint. You may sand between coats with 240 grit. I do 2 coats of each, first coats diluted 10% with water.

Depends what I am painting, I put a 5th and 6th coat of water based polyurethane varnish for extra protection and better finish. This will give semi gloss finish.

The main thing as DIYer, never rush, be patient take your time, repeat if necessary.
 
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Re post above: Dulux Quick Dry Satinwood is the Water based paint. They do solvent based satinwood too. Read the label.
 
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80grit to level and key the surface. The finest (highest number) grit Decorators abrasive paper you can find between costs (I use old, worn sandpaper) to de-ni

I don't recommend anything finer than 240 or 320 grit. If you go over those grit numbers you risk "polishing" the paint and reducing adhesion (I was told that by tech support at Morells years ago).
 
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No more gloss, no more oil based paints. No hybrids.

Roller wherever possible, otherwise brush.

I use Leyland Acrylic undercoat primer and finish with Dulux Satinwod paint

Sand with 60 grit, fill holes, sand with 120 grit, prime and paint. You may sand between coats with 240 grit. I do 2 coats of each, first coats diluted 10% with water.

Depends what I am painting, I put a 5th and 6th coat of water based polyurethane varnish for extra protection and better finish. This will give semi gloss finish.

The main thing as DIYer, never rush, be patient take your time, repeat if necessary.

Sorry, but as a professional decorator, I absolutely hate the finish achieved with rollers one woodwork. It is one of my many pet hates.

I do however use Leyland acrylic primer because it is one of the few waterbased primer/undercoats that sands back without clogging the "sandpaper".
 
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I found the best water based is Dulux diamond satinwood gives an almost brush mark free finnish
 
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On some of these YouTube videos albeit from the USA, many rave about pouring in some 'extender' into the paint as it 'levels' the paint more thus leaving brushless marks. Does anyone use or recommend this stuff?

Without breaking the bank, what type of paint and paintbrush can be recommended to get the best finish? The colour will be white and I'm not bothered about quick drying. The only reason I chose water based was because it is said that it won't yellow over time unlike an oil based one.

Floetrol is the market leading "extender". Other versions such as XIM- Extender are often a bit cheaper. A friend of mine who recently retired wanted a cheaper option- I gave him a bottle of propylene glycol that I had purchased years ago to test as an alternative to Floetrol. I never got around to testing it but he said that it made it much, much easier to "lay off" his acrylic eggshell.

Personally, I hate working with waterbased wood finishes. They are difficult to lay off, often require many more coats and are far less durable. The oils in your skin will, in areas of high "touch" traffic, result in the paint becoming soft and peeling off. You are correct that they will not yellow. Oil based paints yellow because of a lack of UV light.

In 2010 the VOC compliance regulations resulted in the solvent levels in oil based paints being reduced. Early formulations were awful. Paints yellowed within weeks. These days they are as reliable (yellowing wise) as the oil based paints of old. In short, a room with little natural lighting will see oil based paints yellow but oil based paints flow better and are more durable (but smell more).
 
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I found the best water based is Dulux diamond satinwood gives an almost brush mark free finnish

I haven't found that personally, but in "theory", water paints should be capable of achieving a flatter finish given that they cure by shrinking back (coalescence).

My speciality used, for many years, to be painting MDF cabinets. I was 95% hand painting (on site) with oil based finish coats (and 5% spraying with 2K paint off site). I can normally guess if a unit has been finished in water or oil based paints simply by looking at the brush strokes, assuming that either decorator was pretty good. One give away is on doors where the styles and rails meet. They are less "fluid" when working with waterbased paints (given that it doesn't flow as well).

For the record, the only waterbased paint that (with Floetrol as an additive) that I ever "enjoyed" using is Eico.


I used the 10% sheen and was impressed at how minimal the tramlines were. It was absolutely rubbish at obliterating the yellow in the old gloss that I was covering though. I had to use oil based undercoat and then wait a few days before applying the Eico to prevent fisheyes.
 
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I'm not a painter but it's the only one I found I can use without Flo but it is quite prone to runs if you're not carefull
 
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Floetrol as above and get yourself a purdy bruss and get ready for a few coats as coverage can be crap

I second both the purdy brush and floetrol.

To the OP- be advised that not all purdy brushes are created equal. The Purdy Silver Tips sold at Screwfix are awful (and overpriced when compared to equally rubbish synthetic brushes). IMO the best Purdys for woodwork are the Purdy Sprig Elites. You are looking at about £15-18 for a 50mm brush, but if looked after, it will last years, provide a better quality of finish and be less less likely to flick paint whilst you are using it.


If working with waterbased paints, give the brush a light mist of spray (from time to time) to prevent the waterbased paint drying on the bristles (and ruining it).

If working with emulsion, the Purdy Monarch Elite is better because it holds more paint

 

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