Woodworm in row of sheds - worth treating?

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Hi folks,

My son has a flat in a Victorian building. The former coal sheds in the garden are a single building with 3 granite walls (rear and gables) and a wooden front "wall" and a slate roof.

The building has been divided internally with wooden partitions into 6 "sheds" (1 for each flat) each with a wooden door on the front wall.

There is obviously active woodworm in my son's "shed" and the sheds on either side of his.

I have 2 questions:-

1 - Is it worth treating his shed if the sheds on either side remain untreated?
2 - How likely is it that woodworm could be brought into the flat if wooden items are stored in the shed?

Thanks
 
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1) yes
2) very

but modern, centrally-heated houses are usually very low humidity, and woodworm is not the problem it used to be as they do not thrive in dry conditions.

he can treat his shed, and any wood in it, with a wood preserver. They mostly protect against both worm and rot these days.

Perhaps his neighbours will agree to him treating their sheds as well.

Some treatments can be sprayed, but they are obviously poisonous, so hazardous to health if inhaled or get on the skin or in eyes.

Cuprinol Green is no longer available. Cuprinol clear still is, and some shed preservers. Clear can be used on furniture or indoor woodwork and can be painted over. It does not smell too bad..

There are own-brands, such as Wickes, which seem to be of a comparable formulation. The ones containing Permethrin kill woodworm. You may have to read the Safety documentation to find the ingredients. Expect to pay in the region of £30 for 5 litres. They often contain a tint, such as green or brown. You have to stir very well before and during use or it will sink to the bottom. They may also leave a water-repellent film which is intended to help protect outdoor woodwork. Apply several coats, wet on wet, so it soaks inro the surface. Remember you are looking for a wood preserver, not a stain or paint. Check ingredients on the tin or website.

Examples:
http://www.cuprinol.co.uk/products/ultimate_garden_wood_preserver.jsp

http://www.cuprinol.co.uk/products/wood_preserver_clear_(bp).jsp

http://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-High-Performance-Wood-Preserver-5L-Woodland-Green/p/170778

http://www.wickes.co.uk/Ronseal-Shed+Fence-Preserver-Dark-Brown-5L/p/155181

Own-brands should be cheaper.
 
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Hi John,

Many thanks for this. My wife and I were brought up with horror stories of woodworm infestation but most people don't seem to worry about - possibly because of the modern, warm & dry housing you mention.

It's difficult getting access to the neighbouring sheds (the flats are let and the owners are difficult to get in touch with) but we'll treat his.

Thanks again!
 
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