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worktop jig

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by navgeeza, 14 Mar 2003.

  1. FMC

    FMC

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  3. masona

    masona

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    [​IMG]

    fitter,

    Find a picture you want to use, right click on the picture and click on properties, copy & paste URL address then click onto on the diynot forum copy & paste the address then click [img] again, should look like this below.
    [img ]http://www.tooled-up.com/artwork/ProdImage/TB19798.jpg
     
  4. fitter

    fitter

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    Masona
    Thanks for that, I'll give it a try next time.

    Must say I'm a bit worried about posting before yours. I think he may have been trying to say something to me but just put question mark in.
    I hope he realised I was only joking about having to kill him.
     
  5. greenep

    greenep

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    I am also in need of somebody to make a Worktop join for me (I did consider tackling it myself until I read these posts).

    I don't suppose 'Fitter' lives anywhere near Bournemouth?

    Failing that, can anybody recommend a compitent fitter around Bournemouth/Christchurch area?

    Thanks.
     
  6. fitter

    fitter

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    greenep
    sorry I do not live near Bournmouth, I'm only a kitchen fitter and could not afford to.
     
  7. discoduck

    discoduck

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    Just to let you all know I didn`t take the "killing" part too seriously :LOL: .
    Thanks for your advice anyway, I might need your help again in the near future :) .

    Cheers Disco Duck.
     
  8. ivorbigun

    ivorbigun

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    your very good at telling people the cant do it {fitter}
    im sure the could with a few practices its easy
    im also a fitter and the worktops are probably the easiest thing
    after the cornice and light rail that is
    the hardest part is all the lifting and carrying
    so come on and dont talk crap to all these people
     
  9. fitter

    fitter

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    Ivor you may have a bigun but it certainly isn't between your ears.
     
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  11. fitter

    fitter

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    Ivor....where are you? now that you have told me how easy it all is I was hoping to pick your brain, ( who was that who said shouldn't take long? don't be so rude).
     
  12. craigf

    craigf

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    Fitter where abouts are you from as I am in need of a skilled worktop fitter for 3 joints to be done the last week in July. ?
     
  13. fitter

    fitter

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    craigf.....Essex
     
  14. craigf

    craigf

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    Fitter I don't suppose you fancy a trip to Nottingham
     
  15. fitter

    fitter

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    criagf....I do but not to work, sorry.
     
  16. --tom

    --tom

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    does 30mm mean the length of the collet? could someone walk me through making an MDF jig?
    thanks
     
  17. keelbolt

    keelbolt

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    Well, after the discussion, I just did it. Hired the jig and the router from the local tool hire store, bought a brand new blade, and set to work.

    The worktop was a U formation, and the main problem was that the base of the U was not at right angles - one corner was 110 degrees, the other was 85 degrees. Old Somerset houses are not built square!

    The trick was to cut in the worktops on the two walls of the U first, then to rough-cut in the worktop at the base of the U leaving plenty of overhang for potential mistakes!

    Setting up the jig simply requires an absolute 90 degree , regardless of the back angle, on all cuts. Provided you have a carpenter's square, it's easy enough to get. You pencil in the right angles AS IF the walls were square, then set the jig to these lines. It meant that I had to remove the stops on the jig, but that wasn't too much of a problem.

    Measuring, and getting the angles absolutely at right angles is the key to success.

    Once the right angles are pencilled in (I used white paper masking tape on the top of the work surface so I could see it easily, and to protect the laminate), I removed the stops of the jig (they would have set the jig to the wall angle, not to 90 degrees), set the jig by measuring the width of the cut from the edge of the jig, then did the cut.

    The first cut was slightly out, but only because I misunderstood the cryptic markings on the jig. Having allowed plenty of overhang for mistakes, it was easily rectified in a second, more accurate cut.

    I now have beautiful mason's mitres on both joints, neither of which are on right angle walls. Once you understand the jig, it really isn't as difficult as one might think.

    But it does require VERY careful measuring, and you cannot afford to say 'I THINK the jig works like this'. You HAVE to understand the way the jig is set up. For example, the length of the dogbone cuts are set to the length of the standard bolts - and they are marked on the jig. But you have to realise that first!

    Once you understand the jig, the rest is fairly straightforward. As I said, I used a new cutting blade, and took only 10mm at a time, thus keeping the blade sharp. I found it also helps to make the cuts fairly fast - not going slowly as one might think - so that the blade is kept fairly cool. There are two exceptions to the fast-cut - when you are cutting through the laminate, and when making the final smooth cut.

    Be prepared for VERY large amounts of sawdust - after five cuts, the kitchen looked like an old fashioned butcher's shop - at least half an inch of sawdust in the cutting areas, and fine dust everywhere. If I could have done it, I would have cut outside!

    I would not describe myself as an experienced DIYer - and this was my first kitchen installation. I had shown the drawings to an experienced fitter, who didn't like the angles at all. The quote was £100 a corner. £200 for making the joints was too much, which is why I decided to do it myself.

    The hints and tips on this forum were a huge help - without them, I wouldn't have attempted it

    I'm glad I did. The finished result looks great, and I am doubly proud of the difficult angles.
     
  18. DIYnot Local

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