AC series-wiring special dimmer switch/remote control, but lights no longer come on

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Other than what?
Other than the usual neon type people mean by screwdriver testers.

These
upload_2017-2-4_16-4-9.jpeg
 
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Other than the usual neon type people mean by screwdriver testers. These ...
What's the difference?

In any event, I imagine that both are equally usable for "quick identification of, for example, a switched or permanent line and other things like that", aren't they?

Kind Regards, John
 
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The difference is you don't have to touch the end for live tests - you don't even have to hold it at all.

For continuity you touch the end.
 
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About that "tingle"... Well, I can give you something to compare it to now.

A neon screwdriver / voltage tester. When it's on a Live wire and glowing, move your finger around on the contact on the end.. that buzz/tingle, is exactly what I was feeling on the metal faceplate and backbox which had this unconnected earth wire loose in the ceiling. It can only be capacitive coupling can't it? It wasn't connected to anything, but had the live / switched running alongside it.
Neon screwdrivers are pretty useless, but they're better than trying to judge a voltage by the strength of the 'tingle', or asking your father to do the same.
 
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The difference is you don't have to touch the end for live tests - you don't even have to hold it at all.
How do they work? - they presumably must rely on some capacitive coupling to earth (from one end, but not the other end, of the neon), even if not via a human body?

Kind Regards, John
 
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Neon screwdrivers are pretty useless, but they're better than trying to judge a voltage by the strength of the 'tingle', or asking your father to do the same.

I'm just saying there was something there. I always thought about 50v was the smallest I'd be able to feel :)
 
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I'm just saying there was something there. I always thought about 50v was the smallest I'd be able to feel :)
It depends upon how you're feeling it. I know that the mechanism is different, but try putting your tongue onto the two terminals of a 9V battery - even a 1.5V one might produce some sensation!

Kind Regards, John
 
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It depends upon how you're feeling it. I know that the mechanism is different, but try putting your tongue onto the two terminals of a 9V battery - even a 1.5V one might produce some sensation!

Kind Regards, John

ah yes i do know this. I already said it was possibility the finger-tip equivalent of a 3v coin cell on the tongue.
 
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I've no idea. They have a battery in them, if that is any help.
The battery doesn't really make any difference (to what we're talking about) - there's still a need to get a capacitive 'connection' to earth.

The datasheet Carl linked to clarifies. As I suspected, your statement that "you don't have to hold it at all" is not correct. You do have to hold it, although you don't have to touch the end contact - so it's again just down to capacitive coupling.

Kind Regards, John
 
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No, you don't.
Interesting. The instructions say to 'hold it by the insulated handle'.

Are you saying that if you somehow connect the tip of the device to something live, without personally being anywhere near it, the LED will light? If that is the case, then I'm obviously wrong, but I would not have thought that there would be enough capacitance from the device itself to earth for it to work.

If it is that 'sensitive', then one might expect that, particularly when it was being held, it would be very susceptible to lighting up by virtue of 'stray voltages'. Is that your experience?

Kind Regards, John
 
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Interesting. The instructions say to 'hold it by the insulated handle'.
Well they would, as opposed to touching the end.

Are you saying that if you somehow connect the tip of the device to something live, without personally being anywhere near it, the LED will light?
Yes.
If that is the case, then I'm obviously wrong,
Yes. (not a very good picture)
upload_2017-2-4_17-59-44.png

but I would not have thought that there would be enough capacitance from the device itself to earth for it to work.
I don't know how it works.

If it is that 'sensitive', then one might expect that, particularly when it was being held, it would be very susceptible to lighting up by virtue of 'stray voltages'. Is that your experience?
Possibly - as it is also a non-contact detector when holding the tip (or touching the other end) - but then, don't use it for anything hazardous.
 

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