Alarming advice

Joined
25 Nov 2008
Messages
96
Reaction score
0
Location
Yorkshire
Country
United Kingdom
Bit of a noob query (like most of mine on here, actually) but I'd like some advice on smoke alarms.

We've just moved into a new house in which there is a smoke alarm on the landing that is connected to the intruder alarm. This seems to do the trick (thankfully not had to use it!) but we'd still like some independent smoke alarms installed.

Our electrician quoted us £200 to have 2 smoke alarms wired in to the electrics. This seems a heck of a lot, so instead we're planning to get a couple of battery-powered smoke alarms.

I had a look online but was dazzled by the choice! When did there become so many options? Ionisation... Photoelectric... Combination... Heat alarms... etc. There didn't seem to be a clear idea of what to go for, with pros and cons for each. Also, when did they become so expensive? They seemed to be £15-£20 each! (I remember when they were just a fiver etc. etc.)

Therefore, I was wondering what you recommend? We definitely want 2 - one in the hallway, and one on the landing, but other than that, we're not really sure!

Also, we're thinking of getting a carbon monoxide alarm. Our gas boiler is outside in the garage, but we have a gas fire in the living room. Should we get an alarm for the living room? Should we get a combination one with the smoke alarms? I've heard you should put them where you sleep... Again, any advice?
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
3 Nov 2006
Messages
26,580
Reaction score
2,811
Location
Bedfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
Talk to the Fire Prevention Officer at your local first station. The source of best advice and in some areas free supply and fitting of alarms.
 
Joined
14 Feb 2012
Messages
1,137
Reaction score
171
Location
Cambridgeshire
Country
United Kingdom
Go for the more expensive optical/photoelectrical type (rather than ionisation) as they are much less likely to false alarm from burnt toast, steamy showers, draughts, etc. Rate-of-rise heat detection is useful too.
 
Joined
25 Nov 2008
Messages
96
Reaction score
0
Location
Yorkshire
Country
United Kingdom
Our electrician has now revised his quote for the 2 smoke alarms to £160. Still seems a lot to me.

Other than not having to replace batteries, is there any other advantage to having a smoke alarm that is wired into the electrics?
 
Joined
15 Nov 2005
Messages
77,072
Reaction score
4,780
Location
Crossgates, Europe
Country
Cook Islands
The wired ones are now generally interconnected (ask) which puts the price up. The big advantage is that a fire detected by one alarm will cause the other to sound. So for example if one is in the kitchen, and the other in the landing, you will probably be woken if the tumble-drier goes up during the night, or something has been left on the cooker, as occasionally happens.

I also have one in my integral garage (car, petrol, oil, paint, white spirit, barbie charcoal, etc)
 
Joined
16 Feb 2011
Messages
9,233
Reaction score
1,420
Location
Sheffield
Country
United Kingdom
£160 is NOT a lot of money if it saves your life and your home ! Price of mains cable plus smoke alarms plus fuse of mcb plus doing a certificate for the work
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
25 Nov 2008
Messages
96
Reaction score
0
Location
Yorkshire
Country
United Kingdom
I take your point about the cost, but I'm not comparing £160 with not doing anything at all.

I'm comparing £160 with £40-ish for battery smoke alarms.

If the battery smoke alarms will do the same job, I'd rather pay a 1/4 of the price.
 
Joined
26 Feb 2004
Messages
2,985
Reaction score
557
Location
Essex
Country
United Kingdom
Fast asleep, early hours of the morning, went to bed tired - don't expect, or rely on, hearing the downstairs one!!

Also having spent some 20 odd years in the fire brigade I can assure you replacing batteries is not high on many householders agenda so anything that saves this is worth a bit of extra money.
 
Joined
15 Nov 2005
Messages
77,072
Reaction score
4,780
Location
Crossgates, Europe
Country
Cook Islands
since smoke and heat will rise, the landing ceiling is the correct place, but what is the point of one in the downstairs hall?

why not have one near the kitchen where fires are most likely to start?
 
Joined
25 Nov 2008
Messages
96
Reaction score
0
Location
Yorkshire
Country
United Kingdom
since smoke and heat will rise, the landing ceiling is the correct place, but what is the point of one in the downstairs hall?

why not have one near the kitchen where fires are most likely to start?

The downstairs hall is adjacent to both the kitchen and the living room so it seemed a good place to cover both rooms.
 
Sponsored Links
Top