Are stud walls ever load bearing?

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Hi All,

I want to remove the two walls between the two bedrooms upstairs which form an airing cupboard and a wardrobe in each room and then replace these with a single stud wall between the two rooms and have a 3m fitted wardrobe in each room.

Both the existing walls are just stud, is there any chance that they could be load bearing?
 
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In my experience, I'd say it is possible that they are load bearing. Unlikely, but possible.

You need to get a look at what's above them.... wall, joists, joist hangers....? Have a look. You'll never regret being careful!
 
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They're no hangars. The walls are just sitting perpendicular to the ceiling joists

The walls including plasterboard are only about 90mm thick, so the wood frame is made from 2" x 1"
 
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Perpendicular...? or parallel?

Perpendicular would suggest the ceiling joists could well be resting on the stud walls. (The definition of perpendicular in geomety terms is "at right angles").

If you actually mean parallel, then it is a different matter, but have you actually had a look above?
 
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At right angles, yes.

I've not been in the loft yet. I will be replacing the walls with another one.

I will check in the loft, but I think when it comes to it, I will remove one wall, replace with the new stud wall and then remove the other, rather than removing both.
 
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A lot will depend on the loft-space construction. If you have a modern roof truss structure, the ceiling will (almost certainly) be attached to the underside of these - so the stud wall will probably not be load bearing. If the roof is an older type, then it is more tricky. You do have to be a careful that you know what is / isn't sitting on what. It isn't hard, you just need to look. It also helps if you have an idea of how much the house has been messed-about with in the past.
 
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A lot will depend on the loft-space construction. If you have a modern roof truss structure, the ceiling will (almost certainly) be attached to the underside of these - so the stud wall will probably not be load bearing. If the roof is an older type, then it is more tricky. You do have to be a careful that you know what is / isn't sitting on what. It isn't hard, you just need to look. It also helps if you have an idea of how much the house has been messed-about with in the past.

My bathroom wall was offering some support to the ceiling joists. If removed, the ceiling would have definitely sagged to some extent, especially if walked upon in the loft.
Luckily I was only moving it a foot ;)
Simon.
 
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Very few first floor stud walls are load bearing, especially if just around an airing cupboard. Just look in the loft
 
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