Are you allowed to have a boiler in a bathroom?

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Hi

I'm planning a loft conversion and as part of this I'd like to move the combi-boiler from our kitchen into the converted loft space, possibly in the new ensuite that would be created. This would also be easier to connect up the pipework for the heating and water supply.

Just want to know if there are any regs that would mean that halfway through the project it can't be done.

Cheers
 
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I'm not a heating engineer but I can't see why not as long as all the electrics are in a cupboard possibly and not where steam/condensation can get into them but one thing I will say is that a mate of mine has his combi boiler in his loft and it takes an absolute age for the hot water to reach the kitchen and ground floor loo taps. They usually wash in cold water or boil the kettle!
 
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Yes, fine as long as all the electrical bits are suitably IP rated, and preferably have it in a cupboard. Some boilers are IP rated so don't actually technically need to be in a cupboard but it's always best if they are
 
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I'm not a heating engineer but I can't see why not as long as all the electrics are in a cupboard possibly and not where steam/condensation can get into them but one thing I will say is that a mate of mine has his combi boiler in his loft and it takes an absolute age for the hot water to reach the kitchen and ground floor loo taps. They usually wash in cold water or boil the kettle!
That's interesting. Thanks.

Any plumbers able to comment on how that could be overcome?
 
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Any plumbers able to comment on how that could be overcome

Common sense suggests having a store of hot water as close as possible to the place it will be used will reduce waste.

Waste of water while waiting for hot water to reach the tap.

Waste of heat as hot water in the pipe cools after the tap is turned off.

My cottage has two hot water cylinders due to the very long pipe runs between kitchen and bathroom.
 
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>>Snip<< I will say is that a mate of mine has his combi boiler in his loft and it takes an absolute age for the hot water to reach the kitchen and ground floor loo taps. They usually wash in cold water or boil the kettle!

Mate has had this done last year; moved combi boiler into the loft. He has found his water bill (he's on a water meter) has gone up due to the amount of water he his wasting running the hot tap in his kitchen whilst waiting for the hot water to run through. Roughly a bowl full (around 7 litres) every time. Now wishes he had it in the utility room.
 
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Mate has had this done last year; moved combi boiler into the loft. He has found his water bill (he's on a water meter) has gone up due to the amount of water he his wasting running the hot tap in his kitchen whilst waiting for the hot water to run through. Roughly a bowl full (around 7 litres) every time. Now wishes he had it in the utility room.
I'm happy and sad to hear this.

Sad because our boiler is in a lean-to type utility room that we want knocked down and rebuilt at some point and we were hoping to move the boiler in advance to facilitate this future work.

Happy because we know in advance what the practical drawbacks will be.

It does raise the question of whether the same issue occurs in reverse if we build a loft conversion with bathroom and leave the boiler in the utility, e.g. time to get hot water in the loft bathroom?

Perhaps we can get a water tank in the eaves cupboard of the loft conversion?
 
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It does raise the question of whether the same issue occurs in reverse if we build a loft conversion with bathroom and leave the boiler in the utility, e.g. time to get hot water in the loft bathroom?

Perhaps we can get a water tank in the eaves cupboard of the loft conversion?

A combi usually has an additional built-in delay after you turn on the tap, while it fires itself up and starts getting hot (some have a keep-hot store inside)

When you're running a bath, the delay doesn't matter, but the tap you use most often for small amounts is the one that wastes the most. Probably the kitchen.

Put the cylinder as close as you can to the taps. It does not have to be next to the boiler. Insulate the pipes and set the boiler timer to fully heat the cylinder morning and evening, so it does not run every time you wash your hands. As Bernard says, you can have two cylinders if you want.

Some people like to have a HW cylinder for baths and showers, heated by a combi for the kitchen (any combi can heat a cylinder if you add the usual valve and controls). An unvented cylinder can give unsurpassed hot water flow for baths and showers.
 

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