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Bathroom socket in Hong Kong?

Discussion in 'Electrics Outside of the UK' started by jobin, 6 May 2011.

  1. jobin

    jobin

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    Am new here (DIYnot and HK) and am rewiring my flat. Lots of ignorance but am progressing. My former experience only in USA, where 110v rules and i can speak the language. Here 220v, poor language communications and mostly UK codes. In house i have only brick walls thus all cables housed in PVC lashed to the concrete lintels approaching the junction or switch box, etc. Total house 'consumer unit' only 60amps, cannot be upped. Regarding installing a socket in the bathroom i am unsure if foolish idea. Will surely also install RCD so maybe OK. Also, have read that all bathroom switches to be installed outside of room, and this i will do. Any thoughts on the socket in the bathroom?
     
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  3. solair

    solair

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    I'm not entirely sure about Hong Kong wiring regulations, however they are loosely based on the UK.

    In the UK and Republic of Ireland you cannot install a socket in a normal bathroom other than a special shaver socket which contains an isolating transformer.

    They're often built into the mirror / bathroom cabinet [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    These sockets are only compatible with 2-pin UK/IRL shaver plugs. They will also, however, accept the small 2.5amp Euro-Plug used on all shavers and toothbrushes sold in Europe and also 2-pin US/Chinese and Australian plugs. The big versions of the sockets, more aimed at hotels than households, output 115V and 230V.

    The socket contains an isolating transformer which makes them safe for use in a bathroom wet environment. They also will only output a tiny amount of power, which is enough to run or charge a shaver or an electric toothbrush.

    If you want to use a heavy appliance e.g. a hairdryer, you have to use it in the bedroom.

    My advice, is to just dry/style your hair at your dressing table. That's how most people in the UK and Ireland would tend to do it. The concept of having a hairdryer or any electrical appliances other than shavers/toothbrushes in the bathroom is pretty alien to us.
     
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