1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

best tool to use for cutting kitchen worktops to size?

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by largerjt, 12 Jun 2007.

  1. pjholybloke

    pjholybloke

    Joined:
    12 Jun 2007
    Messages:
    297
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    Superior!?? Doh!! been using the wrong tools all these years... :LOL:

    Seriously though, you make a sound point. Although I'm confident I can cut a stanley mark in two with a jigsaw, it's a tool that's rarely out of my hands (no sniggering at the back please), and on reflection whenever I take on new labour their initial attempts at using a jigsaw in this manner are .. ahem.. a little wayward.

    I stand corrected, but superior? Ouch that hurt. :cry:
     
  2. largerjt

    largerjt

    Joined:
    11 Aug 2006
    Messages:
    67
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Can anyone recommend a jigsaw? I've seen this one but its a bit more than i would like to spend.

    Bosch GST 135BCE Jigsaw 240V

    thanks
     
  3. big-all

    big-all

    Joined:
    12 Jul 2004
    Messages:
    17,666
    Thanks Received:
    1,315
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  4. largerjt

    largerjt

    Joined:
    11 Aug 2006
    Messages:
    67
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I was thinking of something under £100 overwise fitting this kitchen is turning out to be very expensive. I already brought the worktop jig/router plus lots of other bits.

    thinking about it, it may have been cheaper to get someone else to fit the work tops
     
  5. pjholybloke

    pjholybloke

    Joined:
    12 Jun 2007
    Messages:
    297
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Have you thought of hiring one? That model Bosch is very good as it has blade clamps to help keep the cut on a tight line, and to be fair £135 is very good value. However, if its more than you want to spend, Ryobi do a decent range of tools at very competetive prices. Don't forget 650W min but 720+ ideally

    Alternatively if you're anywhere near Walsall I've got a spare GST135 you can borrow.

    You're probably right it could well have been cheaper to get someone in to do it for you, but think of the satisfaction you'll get from doing it yourself - priceless. Except for the jig, router, jigsaw.......

    Good luck.
     
  6. pjholybloke

    pjholybloke

    Joined:
    12 Jun 2007
    Messages:
    297
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  7. largerjt

    largerjt

    Joined:
    11 Aug 2006
    Messages:
    67
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    firstly thank you very much for the offer of lending me the jigsaw. unfortunately i'm in essex so a bit to far. How much of a difference is there between the bosch and the ryobi? will the bosch give me a much better cut?

    thanks
    Rob
     
  8. largerjt

    largerjt

    Joined:
    11 Aug 2006
    Messages:
    67
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    also, do i need T144D or T144DP blades?
    thanks
     
  9. pjholybloke

    pjholybloke

    Joined:
    12 Jun 2007
    Messages:
    297
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    No problem, shame about the distance!

    The Bosch blade clamps really make a difference when you need to change direction during the cut, so if its a straight cut - not much in it. In a professional environment I would recommend the Bosch every time, but if its something you don't see yourself using on a regular basis - the Ryobi will be fine.

    You need T144D - accept no alternatives - and make sure you set the orbiter on the jigsaw to maximum which is normally 3. The orbiter ensures that as well as the blade moving straight up and down you get a litlle forward movement as well, making the cut a lot easier.

    The trick in the cutting is to make sure you keep the foot of the jigsaw firmly against the underside of the worktop (purely to overcome the force of gravity), keep your wrist and forearm straight and use the movement of your shoulder and straightening of your upper-arm to slowly push the jigsaw forwards. I find it easiest to support the worktop on two trestles (or similar) and cut on my knees. Also make sure you wear suitable eye protection as laminate splinters can be very nasty.

    When you start the cut it's best to use your left-hand (presuming you're right-handed) to support the side of the jigsaw foot as you ease it into the worktop profile, after that just keep your eye on the side of the blade thats cutting against your score mark. Keep a steady pressure on and keep it moving forwards in a fluid motion - job done.

    This method also works best for scribing worktops and fillers into irregular walls.

    Try a couple of practice cuts first on some scrap, and let me know how you get on.

    All the best.
     
  10. Harwood Projects

    Harwood Projects

    Joined:
    13 Nov 2006
    Messages:
    10
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Essex
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    Cut the straight cuts with the router then. Clamp the jig onto the worktop and route away. Do it in 4 to 5 passes. I always use a router or knife the line and cut with a hand saw and tidy with a block plane.
     
  11. Scrit

    Scrit

    Joined:
    21 Dec 2005
    Messages:
    1,094
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Basically, yes. You've said it yourself - making a perfectly straight cut with a jigsaw takes a decent jigsaw and some practice - making a straight cut with a circular saw requires a decent blade, a batten and two clamps with the quality of the saw and even the operator being less critical......... That said, the majority of cuts in kitchen fitting (e.g. cut-outs) aren't that critical as the insets (sinks, hobs, etc) have a margin area which will mask minor imperfections

    Scrit
     
  12. pjholybloke

    pjholybloke

    Joined:
    12 Jun 2007
    Messages:
    297
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Don't remember fitting an etc :rolleyes: Think sinks and hobs are it as far as margin for error is concerned. All other cuts are visible and for me a circular saw is for ripping up floorboards in a bathroom. I conceeded the point, but I really don't see the need for labouring it. Horses for courses.
     
  13. largerjt

    largerjt

    Joined:
    11 Aug 2006
    Messages:
    67
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I've managed to get the bosch jigsaw from a well known auction site for a lot less than £140.
    so now i have the tools to do the job, i just hope i can use them :LOL:
    will let you know how i get on
     
  14. big-all

    big-all

    Joined:
    12 Jul 2004
    Messages:
    17,666
    Thanks Received:
    1,315
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    good luck

    remember to practice practice practise
    and to give you maximum chance use a brand new blade for every visible cut on worktops then you can recycle them as nearly new and use for any other task
     
  15. pjholybloke

    pjholybloke

    Joined:
    12 Jun 2007
    Messages:
    297
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    wise words they are carpentry Jedi
     
Loading...

Share This Page