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Best way to cut concrete blocks to shift a doorway

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by dmcfish, 20 Oct 2018.

  1. dmcfish

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    I'm shifting an existing doorway by about 15cm, which is framed by concrete blocks - full photo attached. The engineering is all approved - lintel end bearing still good and all. But I'm not sure how to best cut the block in place without making a huge mess. These blocks are dense and much tougher than the lightweight celcon and such that cut easily with a masonry saw. Last resort is the angle grinder... is will work but takes weeks to clean up the dust!

    Also, any suggests on how to build out the other side of the doorway by about 10+ cm? Bricks? Celcon blocks? On end?

    Thanks
    Dave

    IMG_20181020_133853.jpg
     
  2. mattylad

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    Maybe wetting the whole wall & spraying while using a stihl saw will make less dust - also use lots of taped dust sheets.
     
  3. Tigercubrider

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    Maybe stitch drill using an sds drill?
    You can get saws with a water hose feed but they make a lot of wet mess

    I did something by building a polythene tent with wooden frame to minimise dust and a wet/dry vacuum on full
     
  4. JobAndKnock

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    Hire a Kango KS wall saw?

    Milwaukee Kango KS Wall Saw 001_01.jpg

    They cut reasonably quickly but produce far less dust than a Stihl saw or a grinder. I believe that production has now ceased but a lot of hire places still have them. Arbortech still sell a similar product, the Allsaw, which is available in both electric and petrol versions
     
    Last edited: 20 Oct 2018
  5. dmcfish

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    I think the poly tent is a must and wetting is worth trying too. Stitch drilling is probably the best way to go as of now at least.
    A quick check of my local hire shops show no Kango saw, but worth looking into further. Not a huge job though.
    Thanks
     
  6. SammyInnit

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    Recently did a job similar for my old man, used a 9" angle grinder and got the hose pipe in off the outside tap. Messy but concrete floor so no bother.

    Look at hiring a Hilti DCH 300 + M.class. Vac.
     

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  7. opps

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  8. ^woody^

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    I would not mess about inside a house with a mechanical cutter. Stich drill and bolster, or if soft block tungsten carbide tipped hand block saw.

    For the other jamb, screw some timber posts on.
     
  9. pilsbury

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    I cut a new doorway in a brick wall with a stihl saw. Turned day into night. Luckily the front door was close by and I polythene sheeted and taped up the hall. Think the house would have been a write off otherwise. E45A4A42-8556-4A65-A0E4-CF8CC695FC2F.jpeg
     
  10. dmcfish

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    Stitch drilling with a 12mm SDS, a bolster and pry bar worked very well. Thanks for the suggestions.
     
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