Best way to fix plasterboard overlapping brick and timber frame

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I'm in the process of constructing a small stud wall / door way (around 250mm of stud either side of the doorway), which butts up to a brick wall so that the entire thing runs like one continuous wall. The brick wall has had the plaster stripped away approx 200mm back from the new stud wall.

Attached picture for info.

I am going to plasterboard the wooden frame and then get it skimmed but am unsure as to the best way to go about this.

My thoughts currently are - fix the plasterboard to the wooden frame using drywall screws with the boards overlapping the wooden frame and brick wall, and use adhesive on the brick wall (after cleaning it of excess plaster, etc. and dampening it down with a bit of water to contain the dust).

What i'm slightly concerned about is the possibility of the plasterboard being stressed differently between the wall and wooden frame, and the different types of fixing. Is it possible that it is more likely to crack?
 

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I am going to plasterboard the wooden frame and then get it skimmed but am unsure as to the best way to go about this.

My thoughts currently are - fix the plasterboard to the wooden frame using drywall screws with the boards overlapping the wooden frame and brick wall, and use adhesive on the brick wall (after cleaning it of excess plaster, etc. and dampening it down with a bit of water to contain the dust).

What i'm slightly concerned about is the possibility of the plasterboard being stressed differently between the wall and wooden frame, and the different types of fixing. Is it possible that it is more likely to crack?

Your approach seems ok. I'd cut back a bit more of the plaster to get a straight line to work to, and make sure the existing plaster on the brick is sound. By spanning the gap plus a bit more with plasterboard it should reduce the chance of different stressing. Use Stanley knife and straight edge.

Things to be mindful of -
can't tell from the pic how the stud is aligned with the brick - remember if you dot/dab with adhesive on brick there will be some thickness before the plasterboard. This may make it proud to the existing plaster and when you screw board to stud work, there's no gap there so it could be lower.
Normally you'd opt for 12.5mm boards, but if thickness is an issue, could consider 9.5mm. You need to get it level across for skimming the whole.

Also when the wall is skimmed, scrim tape must be used over the join of existing plaster to board.

May want some brick and mortar into the gaps too against the stud and make sure the stud is well fixed when set.
 
Your approach seems ok. I'd cut back a bit more of the plaster to get a straight line to work to, and make sure the existing plaster on the brick is sound. By spanning the gap plus a bit more with plasterboard it should reduce the chance of different stressing. Use Stanley knife and straight edge.

Things to be mindful of -
can't tell from the pic how the stud is aligned with the brick - remember if you dot/dab with adhesive on brick there will be some thickness before the plasterboard. This may make it proud to the existing plaster and when you screw board to stud work, there's no gap there so it could be lower.
Normally you'd opt for 12.5mm boards, but if thickness is an issue, could consider 9.5mm. You need to get it level across for skimming the whole.

Also when the wall is skimmed, scrim tape must be used over the join of existing plaster to board.

May want some brick and mortar into the gaps too against the stud and make sure the stud is well fixed when set.

Thanks Nick,

Yeah, I've taken the plaster back to where it's solid and not flaking, and boarded in pretty much a straight line from top to bottom.

I didn't use a mixed adhesive in the end, and opted for no more nails, lathering it on like no one's business and then screwed through the board into the mortar joints (these held surprisingly well) more to keep it tight while the adhesive set more than a permanent fixing, but I will leave them in all the same.

The studwork is absolutely solid. I've fixed it to battens between the ceiling joists above and it doesn't move an inch when I rattle it so I'm pretty happy with that! Then I've lined it up with the brickwork and used 9.5mm so it doesn't protrude too much. I'm planning on filling the gap between the board edge and existing plaster with new plaster, letting this set, taping up the joint and skimming over it all. If I try to get the plaster off in a straight line, the whole wall will end up coming down before I manage it!
 
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