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Bosch GHO 40-82c

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by chirpychippy, 25 Nov 2018.

  1. chirpychippy

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    Hello,

    I have this model of power plane, it's been good up until Friday when it started becoming impossible to use. I was shooting in doors, turned the planer on set the front of the planer on the door edge and the feed back was extreme vibration throughout the body of the planer. Pushing the planer across the door edge I get a sense that the planer is trying to pull itself backwards whilst vibrating. The product is out of warranty but still in good nick, the blade in it is brand new, so that's not the problem, I've dismantled it and cleaned it that didn't solve it. I reckon the planer barrel thing that holds the blade is the issue, maybe new bearings, but I've no idea how to dismantle this.

    Me thinks I should just bin it and buy a Makita, what are you thoughts people??
     
  2. Burnerman

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    I think you are absolutely right with your diagnosis.....if you take the belt cover off, remove the belt and grab the pulley on the end of the blade drum you may feel some movement, at least in one end.
    Unfortunately almost every screw has to be shifted to dismantle these things so lots can depend on whether you have the time and inclination! The bearings will only be a couple of quid though.
    John :)
     
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  3. SammyInnit

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  4. Burnerman

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    14 is the motor support bearing but it may as well be replaced when the machine is stripped down.
    Shifting the blade drum pulley can be a bit of a problem, on some machines both pulleys have to be fixed together.....you can't get the belt on otherwise.
    Useful diagram Sammy (y)
    John :)
     
  5. SammyInnit

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    My general thinking is if you're going to strip it down to replace one bearing you might as well do them all for what it costs.
     
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  6. chirpychippy

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    Well as it happens, nope I dont have the inclination, but throwing caution to the wind I did as you suggested, but no, no movement all seems rather solid. So i stripped it, cleaned it, regreased it, re-built it, hallelujah it's still broken.

    This is my second version of this planer and the last, the previous one was returned under warranty, but the scoundrels at Bosch refused to repair it free of charge as it was their opinion I had planed the wrong material with it "wood" "T*ats....

    Makita for me, Bosch can poke it from now on....Thank you for your help John
     
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  7. Burnerman

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    Interesting- presumably there wasn't any bearing wear?
    Just one thing before we leave it, did the motor seem to be spinning at the usual speed?
    John :)
     
  8. chirpychippy

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    Long delay sorry, yes motor seems to be spinning normally, I've still got it, but bought a makita so I can carry on working "yippee' 'that was sarcasm', I'll put it next to my bosch jigsaw that has a switch fault which I may never repair.
    I am of the opinion that everytime power tool manufacturers release a new model its predecessor was of much better quality, they seam to be going plastic fantastic...
     
  9. SammyInnit

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    Plastic is surprisingly strong. It's often poor utilisation of plastics and poorly designed features where the tool will fail. Electrical failures are the new big issues especially with the rise of brush less motors.
     
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  10. chirpychippy

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    My point is this, I had a Makita 1/2 inch router, most if the moving parts were metal, now there all plastic. I had a Bosch Jigsaw with a metal base plate with a clip on plastic plate, now the base plate is just plastic. The manufacture just seems to be going cheaper and cheaper.
     
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  11. SammyInnit

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    You're not wrong and as nice as it is to feel the solidness offered by an all metal construction, it's not always going to perform any less
     
  12. JobAndKnock

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    Case in point: Festool. Their tools are often regarded as being of high quality and accuracy, however they use a large amount of plastics in many tools where weight is of the greatest importance (e.g. their sanders which are super lightweight in the main), but they do resort to metal die castings where extra strength and/or rigidity is required (e.g. gearbox casings in the Rotex sanders, gearbox casing and base of the plunge saws, etc).

    Interestingly whereas for a couple of generations of corded SDS and impact drills Bosch chose to use plastic for the gearboxes (presumably for lightness/low cost) they've returned in the last few years to using metal for most of their gearboxes on the blue industrial range - on the other hand Metabo (a smaller, more traditional firm) never really moved away from using metal gearboxes which in turn gave them a reputation for being heavy, but reliable, if expensive.

    TBH I think that half the reliability thing in drills, at least, is down to periodically cleaning out the gearbox and refilling it with the appropriate grease (e.g. light-weight lithium) - and justr how many people do that these days, or inspect and clean the brushes and coomutator or blow dust out of the switches?

    I'm sorry to hear that the OP still has problems with his GHO. I'm yet to experience issues with mine, but his comments have made me wary of the tool (having said that I use an 18 volt cordless Makita far more these days and that's seemingly unstoppable). Bosch quality certainly seems to be sliding from all accounts. On the jigsaw front I bit the bullet after having worn out my Bosch GST135 jigsaw a few years back and bought a Mafell - eye-watering price (at the time), but another solid performer to date.
     
    Last edited: 6 Dec 2018 at 10:46 AM
  13. opps

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    Unfortunately, they use nylon cogs in the Rotex gear housing though. I have an old ro180 that I will repair one day. I was sanding a floor and the teeth just disintegrated.

    Regarding Metabo. I recently purchased a new Metabo SDS. Like the drill but it is noticeably heavier than my old Bosch SDS.
     
  14. JobAndKnock

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    Didn't realise that the teeth were nylon. Even so, for solid surface sanding they seem to be relatively long lived, but sort of explains why a couple of the guys I know have switches to Deros sanders - they have a direct drive motor without gearing don't they? The upper range Metabos are certainly heavy - but even they must be feeling market pressures and a couple of their bottom end SDS drills (the ones with the black gearboxes) come with plastic gearboxes, so presumably they'll have shorter lives too.
     
    Last edited: 9 Dec 2018 at 3:55 PM
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