Box Gutter Replacement - Lining Recommendations

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Hi all!

One elevation of my bungalow abuts a terrence house. Where it abuts there is a box gutter between the eave of my roof and the solid wall of the terrace. The gutter is approximately 9 metres long. It falls to a hopper & downspout which discharges onto the pavement. It's been fine for some decades, but recently the terrace is getting water ingress which is evidenced by a wet wall in the front room at around the height of the box butter & below. I have no sign of any damp at all on my side. I investigated and found a split in the corner of the lining (which appears to be bitumen asphalt) which I subsequently sealed, but the problem persists. The best thing I think would be to get it replaced / relined, granted this is possibly not best time of the year to do such a job, depending on the chosen lining.

I'm aware of the main options, Lead (likely to get nicked given the height!) GRP, EPDM (including 2.5mm Resitrix), Zinc and other formed options etc.

I wondered what the current recommendations were for lining such a gutter and roughly how much should I be looking to pay for its replacement?

Thanks!
 
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Either method will do.

Consider whether a bit of insulation on the underside and/or upstand would be benefical to remove any internal condensation risk.
 
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Thanks :)

Here's a photo of the gutter, looking towards the pavement outlet. It's just over a foot wide.

I've had a few roofing contractors make their recommendations, some slated GRP, others slated EPDM, others slated felt! Absolutely no consensus whatsoever. Plenty who just don't do box gutters.

One suggested Kemperol, which I had heard of but know little about other than it being a liquid based system.

There is still damp evident on the internal wall of the terrace, but I'm suspecting this could possibly be residual water in the wall following the downpours and ingress through the crack in the gutter, which may have been there for some time, even years. What with this cold damp weather, I'm guessing it's going to take some time for the water to evaporate from the wall. In the meantime there's cold bridging thanks to the solid walls of the terrace, which could be resulting in surface condensation on the interior wall, exacerbated by the wall being saturated. You can progressively feel the increase in cold & damp from the side wall internally toward the front wall. The fissure in the gutter was around a foot back from the front outlet / pavement.

Gutter.jpg
 
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Leofric

Obvious maybe but whatever you use take it far enough up the vertical face of the wall and up the slope of the roof.
 
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Is your neighbours wall solid 9" or cavity? -I know you mentioned solid, just wondered if thats the case.

There may be no damp arrangement in the wall to prevent damp tracking down and across the brickwork -although Im not sure how likely that is to happen with a 9" solid wall.

Im guessing your bungalow has its own wall separate to the terrace, hence no dsmp your side.

The box gutter is shallow, any lining will need dressing up under your tiles
 
L

Leofric

Just a quick comment ,NHBC Standards show minimum distance for taking box gutter lining up the slope under the slates/tiles of a pitched roof.
 
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That looks an odd arrangement.
I would suggest acropol for a diy job.
Kick the second row and see if it moves up the roof, if it does it will reveal the nail on the first coarse, then you can remove them to work.
 
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Yes the wall is solid, it’s a late 19th century terrace. My bungalow wall on this elevation is part formed from a previous building erected circa 1920. It was demolished, save for the perimeter wall, and my bungalow erected in 1980. So we have the 9 inch solid wall of the terrace which abuts another 9 inch solid wall of the previous building on my side, following by a 50mm cavity and finally a concrete block internal wall for my bungalow. Part explains why the gutter is so wide.

I’ve cleared the gutter of moss, and the tiles whilst I was at it. The gutter is actually in quite good condition, save for the odd sag here & here and the now sealed fissure.

My neighbour has had a builder suggest the pointing be ground out and renewed where the lining is chased into the wall. He’s coming to do that this week and I’m paying.

The tiles are concrete Marleys, no nails.
 
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