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Bricks bowing above French doors - advice please

Discussion in 'Building' started by Stacey6388, 21 Apr 2020.

  1. Stacey6388

    Stacey6388

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    Hi - I am feeling a bit lost and would love some advice! I had French doors put in place of a window on my first floor about 2 years ago. There had previously been a window of this size in place as the brickwork was different (although a much smaller one was in place when I moved in) so the builder used whatever lintel was already in place and did not use a new RSJ.

    As you can see the brickwork above is now bowing and I would like advice on whether an RSJ should be retrospectively fitted and how I go about talking to the builder about this?! Building regs did sign this off when installed but only did a very quick visit to sign off numerous things. Also, if work needs doing, will this ruin everything internally I.e. new plaster and decoration?

    Thankful for any advice!
     

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  3. JohnD

    JohnD

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    just to check my suspicions

    how old is the building?

    Is the new window plastic?

    Was the old window wood, with a substantial frame? (photograph your neighbors' windows in similar houses if they are original)

    What do you know about the builder? Long established? local family firm? Limited company?
     
  4. stuart45

    stuart45

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    Some brickwork will need to be removed and rebuilt and a new lintel installed. Looks like a solid wall, so it will affect the interior.
     
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  5. Stacey6388

    Stacey6388

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    To answer JohnD:

    Victorian semi, approx 1890.

    The smaller window when I moved in was plastic- I’ve attached a picture of the back of the house before and one of when the new door was put in.

    The builder is a family firm (but limited company since 1992) they’ve done quite a lot of work for me here (including the French doors below on ground floor which did have a new steel rsj...)

    Any thoughts would be very much appreciated!

    D0E9F7E9-AE43-4B75-BFE1-3901E8F56783.jpeg D60DDEAD-A192-40F0-B104-06E0407EA67D.jpeg D049FEC6-638C-4A5E-8A3A-FF2FE4A95191.jpeg
     
  6. Stacey6388

    Stacey6388

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    Would you think the builder should rectify at no cost or should I expect to be charged for this work? (He supplied the doors of that makes any difference)
     
  7. noseall

    noseall

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    There could potentially be a lot of weight on that French set. Also due to the location, there is little in the way of self-arching. You need to look at roof load (purlins possibly) as well as brickwork stability when dealing with and selecting the lintel.
     
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  8. catlad

    catlad

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    The original builder is either inexperianced or couldn't be bothered fitting a lintel in the first place.
    He should rectify it at his own expense if he has any pride.
     
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  9. i suspect the ‘builder’ was a pvc window and door guy.
     
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  11. JohnD

    JohnD

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    The next door window (picture unclear) looks lower and smaller

    So no doubt when the house was built it had a sturdy wooden windowframe and perhaps a piece of joist or something holding up the brickwork.

    It's been knocked about (the row of tiles is odd) and quite likely the bricks were left standing on the plastic window. I don't suppose there's a proper support. It needs one. A mistake sometimes made by people who fit new windows. You will have to take out quite a few bricks inside and out to rebuild. The plaster inside will need to be done above the window. As Noseall says, there is not enough wall above for it to support itself.

    Not a big building job,but it needs doing properly.
     
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  12. i’d suggest the concrete tiles are there to transport water out , like a cavity tray.
    thats a proper botch . it needs concrete lintels in and out with a cavity tray or pvc /felt insert and weep holes.
     
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  13. Stacey6388

    Stacey6388

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    Thanks very much everyone, I’m off to contact the builder!
     
  14. bobasd

    bobasd

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    A lintel has to be installed but, unless there's interior cracking, I dont think that there's any massive urgency - nothing is going to collapse.
    But the doors will eventually jam, & the glass may crack.



    Working from inside & outside, & using a tower, it would be simple to install a lintel.

    During any work, Hood Mouldings should be installed above both windows.
     
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  15. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    WTF with all the questions?

    It needs a lintel.
     
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  16. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    Why the massive outside handles on those french doors?
     
  17. catlad

    catlad

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    I think its a cavity wall so it should be relatively straight forward. Benny those tiles were a common practice it times gone bye.
     
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