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Building a large shed on a large concrete patio

Discussion in 'Building' started by degsy41, 10 Jun 2015.

  1. degsy41

    degsy41

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    Hi All,

    I am looking at designing a new large shed for my garden to house various items for garden and bikes and a workshop including sink/electricity etc.
    I am at the start of this process and since I have never done this before I would like to state what I have been thinking about and ask advice as to whether I am going down the right route.

    The concrete slab in large and I would like to put in a shed that is about 6m x 6m.
    1. Should I use concrete blocks or wood?
    2. Would I still need a wooden floor or could I get away with using the concrete that is already there?
    3. Would it be advisable to embed the main corner posts in to the concrete or just have the shed sitting on the concrete?
    4. If I should embed the posts in the concrete how would I do this? use the metal fixers used to put in fence posts?
    5. How would I make sure that the bottom of the shed is protected against moisture? Should I wrap the bottom in DPC?
    6. Does anyone have any links to good tutorials on building a large shed? I cant find any when I google it.

    Thanks in advance for any advice anyone can give.

    Regards,

    Degsy
     
  2. theprinceofdarkness

    theprinceofdarkness

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    6m X 6m that's big, what have you done about designing the roof structure?
    The big problem with sheds is the splash back effect from rain running of the walls and soaking the base of the shed, that is why sheds normally have an internal floor which is raised from the actual concrete.
    Sheds are normally free standing (unless you are on a mountain).
    While theory says that you can seal the bottom wall of the shed against water running on the patio, it will be difficult to do in practice. And if it fails you are stuffed.
    Frank
     
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  4. degsy41

    degsy41

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    Thanks.
    I am at the start of planning this and I am a complete beginner. I hope these questions are not too stupid. I've never attempted anything like this.
    Thanks for the advice.

    So, a shed is OK with not being secured to the floor? How would I create the floor on joists but make sure that the joists are protected against damp?
    Do I wrap the joists with DPC?
    I have looked at maybe buying a prefab log cabin (looks like a large fancy shed rather than logs) but they are all quite expensive (£6K) so would rather do it myself to keep the costs down and have my own design.
    I was thinking of building a frame built that included the roof and then adding the walls and roof with planks of wood and adding windows rather than doing it standard shed style of nailing walls and floor together.
    is this a good idea?
    What I want will be fairly big as I want a shed, workshop, store and summer house in one with electricity and running water.
     
  5. theprinceofdarkness

    theprinceofdarkness

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  7. trowlerman

    trowlerman

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    The main thing is to keep your woodwork 150 mm above the conc slab this will protect from damp , I would lays 2 course of bricks then dpc and stick ha shed on that 😀
     
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