Can rafters from one roof be bolted to other roof, not sat on wall plate.?

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Helping a mate sorting his roof out, but the roof looks a bit of a mare.

He's been doing a self build extension.
His bungalow has had an extension and has a vaulted ceiling, with metal beam. (roof 1)
He is converting his garage that will become another room, this also has a pitched roof, (roof 2) the two roofs will intersect and face the same way.
Unless the roof pitch is changed on one side, it's not possible for roof 2 rafters to reach the wall plate.

Is it acceptable practise (will it get signed off) to use bolts/threaded bar to connect the rafters from roof 2 to roof 1?
 
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Helping a mate sorting his roof out, but the roof looks a bit of a mare.

He's been doing a self build extension.
His bungalow has had an extension and has a vaulted ceiling, with metal beam. (roof 1)
He is converting his garage that will become another room, this also has a pitched roof, (roof 2) the two roofs will intersect and face the same way.
Unless the roof pitch is changed on one side, it's not possible for roof 2 rafters to reach the wall plate.

Is it acceptable practise (will it get signed off) to use bolts/threaded bar to connect the rafters from roof 2 to roof 1?
Not sure what you are on about but one roof can support another roof. Also, wall plates can be positioned beneath or above ceiling joists, as long as they are supported correctly.
I'd need to see a photo or a drawing to determine what it is you want to do.
 
I'll get a photo... it's a lot to take in when you've not seen it! o_O
 
Not had chance to get photo but my mate sent me this, if this helps?

The smaller roof (B2) has a larger span long the length of the building, as the floor shape is like an 'L'
The intersection (where there is no wall plate) is around 1.8-2m long.
B1 is vaulted and sat on normal wall plate.
 

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And you definitely need a void in B2, rather than having support members go down to the wall that B1's trusses rest on?
 
Mate has talked about having a raised collar type roof in B2. to get a bit more head height.
So there will be a void in this roof.

B1 roof is already built.

I'm wondering what is the 'right' way to create the intersection, if I read you correct, are you suggesting I could I build a stud wall, up, from the wall plate that B1 sits on?.

Or would it best if I just marry up the rafters into B1's rafters? or is this a big no no??
 
I can't see building control allowing you to rest B1 roof on to B2 rafters without some additional support, you could build up the wall so it meets B2 and that way a lot of the weight could be taken and the new elevated wall plate could be birds mouthed into B2 rafters.
 
That's problematic, and the smaller roof can't be loaded onto to larger roof like that.

Why does that smaller roof have to be that size, with that ridge in that place and that nightmare horizontal valley like that?
 
I could I build a stud wall, up, from the wall plate that B1 sits on?.

Or would it best if I just marry up the rafters into B1's rafters? or is this a big no no??
I was thinking trusses shaped to rest on the wall, but being the proud owner of a valley gutter my recommendation would be a single pitch with interim support, or 'inverted' trusses etc:

1688547345886.png


If that drawing scale is OK it's still around 20 degree pitch

Couldn't quite work out what you meant by L shape but I'd prefer any of these over an above-house gutter (with the one marked * least preferred)

1688548434727.png

B1 is in blue
 

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Ignoring the stupid valley as already mentioned something like this could work, will need an SE I suspect no matter what, probably be able to get trusses made to suit:

se.jpg


Who's done the drawings, it kind of looks like there's a beam shown already at the new ridge?

Hard to see why you'd end up with that valley though, seems poor design.
 
Thanks for the suggestions so far.

There seems to be quite a few issues on this. The roof B2 was is a converted garage, half brick, that has had a second skin built in lightweight block and screw tied to the original brickwork. This is built off the slab, as he spoke to the SE and he didn't want wooden stud walls.

The ridge beam that was illustrated on B2 is not being installed, instead it's going to be a cut roof, not trusses.

I like the idea of one big roof as suggested by @robinbanks but as B1 is already built this may not be possible.

@freddiemercurystwin this idea has legs, my mate, has said the wall between B1 & B2 is also a half brick with second skin built & tied.
So perhaps it's possible to extend the lightweight block wall higher to sit this portion of roof on.

I agree it doesn't seem the best of solutions, especially when an architect had drawn up the "plans" and a SE has had input for the beam and timber spec etc.

Seems a headache to me.

I haven't forgotten photos, but not had chance yet. Uploaded a sketch, the arrow shows the direction of the technical drawing previously posted.



IMG_8261.JPG
 

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