Changing Brake Discs

Discussion in 'Car Repairs / Maintenance' started by RickH, 5 Oct 2021.

  1. RickH

    RickH

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    I need to change Rear Disc & pads on my 2018 Kodiaq.
    Found good videos on steps (as it has EPB)

    Need to change:
    2 x Rear Disc
    2 x Torx 30 csk fixing screws
    2 pairs pads
    2 pairs pad clips / anti-rattle springs
    2 pairs calliper fixing screws
    2 pairs carrier frame fixing screws


    Anybody know if I can buy these as a kit .... workshop video say to change screws & springs, and show kit with all parts, but so far supplier (Euro parts etc) seem to just have pads & discs nothing else.
     
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  3. Mottie

    Mottie

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    If you’re lucky, you sometimes get pad clip/anti rattle springs and caliper carrier fixing bolts with the pads. If not, along with the other screws, they can all be reused. Oh, and you only need 1 set of pads - there will be 2 x pairs (4 pads) in the box. (y)

    Buy a decent set though - Brembo, Mintex, Blue point etc.
     
    Last edited: 5 Oct 2021
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  4. RickH

    RickH

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    Europarts sell Brembo cheap enough, just in the vids they say do not reuse the screws (maybe due to high torque setting) ....so was trying to find if there is a particular outlet sells these as a kit.

    The videos show Eicher Premium parts kits being used ... are these quality items, any reason not to consider them.
     
    Last edited: 5 Oct 2021
  5. Mottie

    Mottie

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    The torx screws are not torqued up, the caliper screws are something like 25Nm so not tight and if you’re lucky, you can wiggle the disc out without removing the caliper carrier. I’m in the trade and have recently replaced the rear discs and pads on my A3 and our Golf. Reused all bolts. Never really known anyone in the trade to go out of their way to fit new caliper bolts unless they came with the pads or fit new carrier bolts or torque them up, actually.
     
    Last edited: 5 Oct 2021
  6. RickH

    RickH

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    I was looking at this video



    .... in here he says always fit new screws. (19:38) that was why I was looking to chnage them.
    They were in the Eicher pads box he used.

    At 20:53 he advise torque for the top screws was 140 Nm and 115 Nm for the bottom .... which is reasonably high torque.
    However, I have not yet confirmed what they should be for my Kodiaq
     
  7. Mottie

    Mottie

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    Well get the eicher set if they come with caliper screws and rattle springs.


    How was you planning to get the handbrake into service mode - do you have VCDS?

    I don’t know why people post up videos showing others how to do things and then say you need a special tool to set the handbrake into service mode. You can get by without one. I have one but I didn’t use it on mine - look here. Unlike the video, make sure the handbrake and ignition is off.
     
    Last edited: 5 Oct 2021
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  8. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    The carrier bolts don't have to be replaced, nor do the caliper bolts, if the pads come with caliper bolts then you may aswell use them.

    Make sure they are lock threaded and all will be well.

    The anti rattle shims in general can be re used.

    The trick to. Good brake install is to make sure everything is squeeky clean.

    Where the disc mounts to the hub smear a thin layer of grease.

    Put a small ammount of grease on the back of the pads and the ears of the pads.

    Always torque the bolts where possible

    Always stick to branded pads, APEC, ferodo, brembo etc.

    My favourite pads are the ferodo premium, unfortunately they cost a fortune aswell
     
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  9. RickH

    RickH

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    Was going to follow steps in this video it shows 2 ways of winding back the pads … electrically (seems simple) or mechanically.
     
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  11. Mottie

    Mottie

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    Do it mechanically like in the link I posted.
     
  12. Old Salt

    Old Salt

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    You can get a decoder/reader from amazon that will let you move the epb to the maintenance position. Did my Seat Ateca recently. Easy job, the new bolts come with thread lock already applied but if they are not supplied just add your own it shouldn’t be a problem.

    Just type vcds into the amazon search box, its about £50 but can be used to read other vehicles codes.

     
  13. RickH

    RickH

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    Thanks for your responses
     
  14. Avocet

    Avocet

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    Watching with interest, as we have a similarly aged Kodiaq and it'll only be a matter of time before I have to do the same thing!

    Couple of general points:

    1. The small caliper screws (as has been said) generally aren't very tight and don't need to be. On every other car, I have always re-used them. Never had one come loose.
    2. The large bolts holding the caliper carrier to the hub, MIGHT need to come off to get the disc off, and those are usually done to a very high torque.
    3. Generally, most grades of "Loctite" tend to soften at about 120 degrees C, which may or may not be enough for brake components. The original ones usually have a blob of "Patchloc" on them, which doesn't really set and withstands higher temperatures.
    4. I'd be inclined NOT to grease hub-to-disc mounting surfaces because the wheel nut torque assumes a DRY joint. The last thing you want, is for your wheel studs (or the little Phillips screw holding the disc to the hub) to be trying to take braking torque when you stand on the anchors! You absolutely need the friction, so that the studs / bolts aren't working in shear.
     
  15. Mottie

    Mottie

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    The little Phillips screw does nothing than hold the disc in place when the wheel is off and it’s the wheel that holds the disc securely in place. I’m pretty sure it’s a dry THREAD that is assumed when torquing up wheel nut/bolts. I’d always advise some grease between the wheel rim and drive flange though.
     
  16. Avocet

    Avocet

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    It's certainly a dry thread that the manufacturers advocate, but I'm not aware of any of them advocating greasing the mating surface either between disc and hub, or wheel and disc either. There will be a clamping force produced by doing the wheel nuts (bolts) up to the specified torque. Ordinarily, with dry surfaces, that clamping force would involve so much friction, that the wheel and disc would be clamped just fine and not go anywhere at all, even if the disc had no bolt holes in it at all and you stood on the brakes and locked them up.

    As soon as you lubricate those mating faces, you have the same clamping load from the wheel bolts / studs, but now you have nothing LIKE as much friction to stop them trying to turn relative to one another.

    Basically, what you want to avoid at all costs, is a shear load going into the studs / bolts / the little Phillips screw. Those are designed to be loaded in pure tension, NOT shear.
     
  17. Mottie

    Mottie

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    Well, I can assure you that alloy wheels that have not had a bit of lube between the wheel and the flange can often be troublesome to remove in the workshop and would be impossible for the average motorist on the roadside. It was a specified service item on my Evoque that came with two years free servicing but even though it was ticked off on the LR service sheet, I ended up doing that task myself as the Landrover dealer must have 'forgotten' to do it.

    45 years in the trade and I’ve never seen or heard of this shear load problem happening that you talk of.
     
    Last edited: 6 Oct 2021
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