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Cost to get a gas hob plugged in.

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by AdamW, 26 Feb 2004.

  1. AdamW

    AdamW

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    I am considering replacing my kitchen. Now, I want a gas hob but am not CORGI registered. In order to have a CORGI bloke come along and plug it in to the bayonet outlet 2 feet away, what is a reasonable cost for parts and labour in the North Hertfordshire area?
     
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  3. walkingonsunshine

    walkingonsunshine

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    Adam,

    A CORGI gasfitter will not connect your hob by flexible hose to a bayonet connector. It has to be connected in pipe all the way and must have an isolating valve fitted. Properly done the gas pipework should also be checked to ensure it will supply the necessary flow of gas at the correct pressure, if not it may also need upgraded. Just because your cooker has been running off it for years does not mean it will be ok.
    You will also have it "tightness" tested before and after to ensure there are no minute leaks. He/she will also ensure the combustion clearance spaces above and to the side of the hob are not impinged.
    It may also require to be electrically connected to ensure the ignitor works.
    Costs? If it's straightforward a reasonable price might be £70-£100 (in Glasgow, don't know the market down your way.)
    If you get hold of the manufacturers instructions for the hob while you are planning the kitchen you can ensure the clearance spaces above and to the side of the hob are met.
     
  4. AdamW

    AdamW

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    I understood that metal pipework would be used: do they use solid pipe or the segmented flexible metal pipe? Just trying to figure out how they can fit a new hob if they can't lift it out!

    I hadn't realised they would need to fit an isolating valve, is this a new reg? The gas cooker that was here when I moved in is plugged straight into a bayonet-fitting outlet that comes straight out of the wall.

    Thanks for the info walkingonsunshine
     
  5. ollski

    ollski

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    A cooker is fitted onto a flexible bayonet fitting hose....a hob as walkingonsunshine said must be fitted to solid pipework. The only flexible pipework that could be used on a hob is the new tracpipe but it is prohibitively expensive.
     
  6. AdamW

    AdamW

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    Was just thinking, aren't gas meters sometimes connected with flexible metal pipes? My parents' one is, as is the meter in a friend's house. Surely these weren't bodged in! The pipe is segmented, like a very big very chunky shower hose.

    So why aren't gas fitters allowed to use them for hobs? It would make their work easier and the pipe would be far less likely to have joints fail from being knocked about.
     
  7. HenryRoot

    HenryRoot

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    Virtually all gas meters use the flexible anaconda type fitting on the domestic side. This is immensely strong and is not made of copper. I wasn't aware that you couldn't use one of the corrugated copper pipes to fit a gas hob but then again I have never needed to as it is simple enough to form copper with pipe benders.

    I only charge 60 quid to connect up a hob - but then I've always been cheap.

    I live in Hertfordshire BTW, so if you want it done just let me know.
     
  8. ChrisR

    ChrisR

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    You need an isolating valve on a hob pipe because the bayonet does the job on a cooker.
    I'm now using soft copper 10mm for hobs - easy to leave a bit of a loop sp the hob can be mobed a bit. You could use 8mm. I mean HE could...

    Tha anaconda type pipes have the wrong threads.
     
  9. jelly

    jelly

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    After reading this you lot have got me quite worried.I am also fitting a kitchen and have got to the stage where i am fitting the units.I am fitting the same setup as AdamW.(Electric cooker and Gas Hob).
    All i have got is a Bayonet fixing sticking out the wall.Will the plumber just
    tee off the pipe just before the Bayonet fixing (the pipe is imbedded in the wall so he would have to smash the plaster off) or will he get rid of the Bayonet fixing so if in the future i wanted a gas cooker it would need replacing again.
    Would now be the best time to get it done before the units/worktops are put back in place.At this stage i would only roughly show him where the hob goes (holding the Hob over where its supposed to be.).I assume the pipes are flexible enough for this.He would then have to come back when the units/worktops are fitted to connect the gas.Is this about right.
     
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  11. AdamW

    AdamW

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    :LOL: My dad got a real telling off from a CORGI when he was called in to refit the hob in my parents' new kitchen: the CORGI found out the hob had originally been installed by a non-CORGI!

    I am firmly of the belief that if all precautions are taken, quality fixings are used and the person is competent, a DIY hob installation would be 99% as safe as a proper CORGI one. However what this thread has shown is that a competent DIYer (even if I do say so myself!)isn't fully competent to install a gas hob. I wonder what percentage of gas hobs bought in the last 2 years are fitted with rubber hoses, by DIYers?

    Anyway, just a final thought, the bayonet fitting on the wall would have to be used whether I had a gas cooker or gas hob, so why is the valve action of the bayonet not adequate for a hob? Is it because a rubber hose can just be disconnected easily?
     
  12. ollski

    ollski

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    The bayonet is used on cookers, tumble driers and bbq's because they are not fixed in position and so need to have some allowance for movement which a solid pipe fitting cannot provide. A hob is permanently fixed so a more secure solid connection must be made.
     
  13. ChrisR

    ChrisR

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    An existing bayonet connection can just be unscrewed to be replaced with a screw-to-pipe fitting. No big deal.

    The main reason a corgi would be needed to do the stuff in practice, is that he will have the kit to chck for leaks, AND know how to use it. It's a bit of tube and would take several whole minutes to show someone what to do, but without that you're stuffed. :confused:
     
  14. HenryRoot

    HenryRoot

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    *choke* what's this? a registered corgi engineer letting on that a mind numbingly easy task does NOT need a 10 year apprenticeship to achive safely????

    Have you checked the corgi disclosure rule 143.24 / 127b?
     
  15. jelly

    jelly

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    Just a thought.How do they connect a separate gas cooker and seperate gas hob.1 with a flexible hose,the other with fixed piping from 1 gas inlet
     
  16. ollski

    ollski

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    yes it's two seperate appliances.
     
  17. AdamW

    AdamW

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    Well, I think tossing up the choices between £60 to get it fitted by a kosher CORGI, or risking getting my bottom sued off by the next owners, £60 sounds quite cheap. Plus I would be paranoid about the possibility of leaks.

    After all, if you decide to save the money and do it yourself, and then the next owners end up blowing their hands off, even if you do everything to CORGI standards and it is not your fault, you could possibly get sued for it. If you have it all done by a CORGI you can wave your piece of paper at them, pass the buck to the CORGI and let their legal insurance fight the case!

    Soft copper piping sounds a bit flimsy to me, it is relatively easy to fatigue the metal through bending/knocking. Silicone hoses actually sound safer to me in this instance as they are less likely to fracture or fatigue. But I don't work with mains gas!
     
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