1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Damaged Plaster from Removing Tiles

Discussion in 'Tiling' started by Paulg31, 5 Oct 2015.

  1. Paulg31

    Paulg31

    Joined:
    26 Mar 2008
    Messages:
    119
    Thanks Received:
    13
    Location:
    Warwickshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hello,

    I'm in the process of decorating my kitchen and I've been removing the old (fairly uneven) tiles and also chasing out some bit of plaster to add new sockets and wiring. Removing the old tiles from the splash backs so far has left the old plaster in quite a bad state. Moving forward I want to re-tile but I'm unsure on the best move next...

    I could get them re-skimmed but this is something I'd need to get a plaster in for as I'd struggle to achieve a level-ish surface to tile on.

    My other idea was to fully remove the plaster in these areas and and fix moister resistant plaster board to the blockwork. In an area where I have chased out the plaster it looks like there is 18-20 mm depth from the undamaged plaster at the edges which didn't have tiles to the blockwork. I was thinking to keep within the same sort of depth us 12.5 mm board with something like Everbuild Pinkgrip Dry Fix. Or could the plaster board screwed to the blockwork? I assume this could be ok to then tile straight on to? This is something I could do myself.

    Many thanks,
    Paul

    IMG_3022.JPG IMG_3023.JPG
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. ree

    ree

    Joined:
    6 Feb 2014
    Messages:
    3,193
    Thanks Received:
    447
    Location:
    California
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You would be best off removing all plaster back to brick, and rendering with sand and cement for a new tile backing.

    Avoid using any plaster board.

    Is there any sign of damp in the splash back or on the wall below the work top?

    What condition is the outside wall surface in - is it rendered?

    Note: all cable must conform to Regs (be run in prescribed safety zones) and be recessed and capped with metal.
    The sockets must be set at a depth to conform to the final finished surface.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. PrenticeBoyofDerry

    PrenticeBoyofDerry

    Joined:
    30 Jun 2009
    Messages:
    21,627
    Thanks Received:
    2,382
    Location:
    Londonderry
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The first thing I would ask is regarding the electrical work, new cables must be routed in the prescribed safe zones and also new buried cable requires RCD protection as do any new socket outlets.
    There is no requirement to cap the cables, but if you feel the need to.....
    To conform to part p of the building regulations, you must assure electrical work carried out is safely undertaken and safe to be put in to service.
    This can only be done by following the guidance in BS7671:2008 (Amd 3 2015) and the requirement for inspection and testing.

    As far as the plastering is concerned, it does require remedial work, if you are tiling over it, it does not have to be perfect, but the flatter/evener it is the easier the tiling will be. You could try using one-coat plaster, that can be sanded down once dry
     
    Last edited: 5 Oct 2015
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  5. Paulg31

    Paulg31

    Joined:
    26 Mar 2008
    Messages:
    119
    Thanks Received:
    13
    Location:
    Warwickshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks guys for your help.

    Yes the wall seems totally dry, no signs of damp. The broken plaster is bone dry and below the splash back behind the cupboards is totally dry.

    I liked the idea of using some sort of board as it looked easier to get a flat surface. I've tried plastering and failed in the past. Never tried rendering before.

    I'm aware the surface doesn't need to be perfect for with me being someone who doesn't tile regularly I though having a totally flat surface to start would be good. I'm sure someone with more experience could cope ok with a more uneven surface.

    Regarding the electrics yes I'm aware of the requirements for safe routing of the cables. We had a new consumer unit fitted earlier this year and the circuits are rcd protected. This was done by a registered electrician and notified as required. Also I have capped the cabling with PVC channel nailed to the bare block work.

    Thanks, Paul
     
  6. Paulg31

    Paulg31

    Joined:
    26 Mar 2008
    Messages:
    119
    Thanks Received:
    13
    Location:
    Warwickshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Also sorry I forgot to add..

    Ree, the wall is a cavity wall. No render of the outside, just facing bricks. The cavity has then got blown insualtion inside.
     
  7. ree

    ree

    Joined:
    6 Feb 2014
    Messages:
    3,193
    Thanks Received:
    447
    Location:
    California
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    If you are happy fixing backer board then do it but it can be slightly more difficult than it seems to get the boards plumb and flat while keeping them tight to the brickwork.

    I say metal capping is a must not because its Regs but because on a backsplash wall with all its various fixings its safest.
     
  8. Paulg31

    Paulg31

    Joined:
    26 Mar 2008
    Messages:
    119
    Thanks Received:
    13
    Location:
    Warwickshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Sorry about the delay, I've been away for a few days.

    Ok I see you're point about boarding. I've not tried rendering before. I'll have a look on here for some info on it. Any tips for first time rendering?
     
  9. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
  10. Sponsored Links
Loading...

Share This Page