1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

DISCONNECTED GAS FIRE REMOVAL

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by GERRY46, 4 Oct 2014.

  1. GERRY46

    GERRY46

    Joined:
    4 Oct 2014
    Messages:
    2
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I intend to remove my gas fire which has already been disconnected from the gas supply and all the gas piping under the floor has been disconnected.

    My question is: This is a modern house with a cavity flue, do I need to cap off the flue once I have removed the gas fire?
    If yes best way to do this and any other things I should consider.

    I intend to install an electric fire in its place any issues?

    Thanks and regards
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. Agile

    Agile

    Joined:
    26 Jun 2004
    Messages:
    63,982
    Thanks Received:
    4,583
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Removing the fire still leaves the flue open and this will suck air out of the room and cool it.

    But capping the chimney will cause dampness unless a small ventilation opening is left and ideally two, one in the room and one in the loft to allow a small air flow to prevent dampness.

    If you cover over the fireplace without capping the chimney then you need to leave a small ventilation opening in the fireplace to allow a small airflow.

    Tony
     
  4. GERRY46

    GERRY46

    Joined:
    4 Oct 2014
    Messages:
    2
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks Tony

    I will be installing a simple electric fire in the space and will cover the gas fire opening with a board, I could leave a small vent in that and leave the chimney open?
    Thanks
    Gerry
     
  5. Agile

    Agile

    Joined:
    26 Jun 2004
    Messages:
    63,982
    Thanks Received:
    4,583
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I would suggest about 5 to 10 square centimeters. Obviously round holes would be normal.

    Too large and you loose too much heat from the room.

    Not enough and you risk dampness.

    Tony
     
  6. FiremanT

    FiremanT

    Joined:
    16 Jan 2012
    Messages:
    9,126
    Thanks Received:
    1,792
    Location:
    Uk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    As 112 says, most weeks, when this comes up, new houses are often built with the FP opening boarded over, with no vent. This is with conventional flues as well as precast. To fit a fire, you have to cut the board out. So there is no real need to be concerned about ventilation.
     
  7. Agile

    Agile

    Joined:
    26 Jun 2004
    Messages:
    63,982
    Thanks Received:
    4,583
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I am only repeating the usual general advice when an open chimney is no longer in use.

    Perhaps on those newbuilds it is expected that a fire will be fitted as soon as they are occupied?

    Or maybe they are just cutting corners?

    Tony
     
  8. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
  9. Sponsored Links
Loading...

Share This Page