1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

DIY sump or block heater?

Discussion in 'General Cars' started by btb23, 5 Dec 2010.

  1. btb23

    btb23

    Joined:
    9 Jul 2009
    Messages:
    79
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Location:
    Leicestershire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Every time we get a spell of sub zero temperatures I always get to wishing I had a 240v heater to pre-heat the engine on these cold mornings. Having looked around they can be had for a minimum of a £100 or so and up to £300 or more.

    I remember my dad had a paraffin sump heater many years ago, I wouldn't want to go down route, though it was cheap and simple and worked.

    Even on a normal winter morning if I had a mains heater to pre-warm the block or sump I'd be glad to turn it on 20 mins or so before setting off in the morning to keep engine wear down, reduce the high fuel, and have a car that has the heater working sooner.

    Has anyone come up with a DIY version? Is there a block heater used for something else that could be attached to the sump? What could be used with a bit of imagination to do the job?
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. wotan

    wotan

    Joined:
    24 Dec 2007
    Messages:
    10,981
    Thanks Received:
    142
    Location:
    Cheshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I would think a heater that warmed the water system would be preferable to just heating the sump, I do however think 20 minutes would not be long enough, more like a couple of hours.

    Wotan
     
  4. btb23

    btb23

    Joined:
    9 Jul 2009
    Messages:
    79
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Location:
    Leicestershire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yes a water heater would be good, though needs a pump to effectively heat the whole water jacket.

    According to the commercially available ones, and reports from people using them where they regularly get sub zero temps half an hour is enough, unless you are in the Arctic circle. Of course it depends on the power, but think of a 2 or 3kW element.
     
  5. voicey

    voicey

    Joined:
    15 Jan 2004
    Messages:
    233
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  6. stuartturbo

    stuartturbo

    Joined:
    10 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    415
    Thanks Received:
    45
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  7. Burnerman

    Burnerman

    Joined:
    7 Feb 2008
    Messages:
    23,146
    Thanks Received:
    4,500
    Location:
    Northumberland
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The Kenlowe product has been around for ages, and it has its own internal pump.
    The problem is lack of space to fit it in the majority of cases, but if you can find somewhere your car is toasty in 20 mins.
    John :)
     
  8. Sponsored Links
  9. gregers

    gregers

    Joined:
    28 Mar 2008
    Messages:
    6,301
    Thanks Received:
    500
    Location:
    Sussex
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    buy a galaxy/sharan/alhambra tdi with a programmable booster heater built in.thats when the bloody things work, ;)
     
  10. TicklyT

    TicklyT

    Joined:
    30 Jul 2006
    Messages:
    3,481
    Thanks Received:
    337
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Sump heaters came about because older types of engine oil used to turn to tar in cold weather. Modern multigrade oils stay liquid at far lower temperatures than older oils, and maintain their viscosity at far higher temperatures too, so the need for 'summer' and 'winter' oils, and the need to to warm up the sump oil has virtually disappeared.
     
  11. Master of None

    Master of None

    Joined:
    31 Oct 2007
    Messages:
    425
    Thanks Received:
    21
    Location:
    Edinburgh
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    20 years ago I had an astra and the heeting would just be starting to get warm when I got to work (4 miles). All the cars I have had in the past 10 years or so are warm in less than a mile or 3 mins or so. I dont see it as an issue now. I think they are designed to warm up quicker now to meet emission levels quicker.
     
  12. Peter.N.

    Peter.N.

    Joined:
    26 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    1,824
    Thanks Received:
    277
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    My recently acquired Peugeot 406 Hdi has an originally fitted diesel powered auxiliary heater, its fantastic this weather, I am getting warm air from the heater within 200 yards and hot in half a mile, don't know if you can retro fit them though.

    Peter
     
  13. empip

    empip

    Joined:
    24 Sep 2005
    Messages:
    6,314
    Thanks Received:
    171
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  14. Peter.N.

    Peter.N.

    Joined:
    26 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    1,824
    Thanks Received:
    277
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks for that. I haven't even found mine yet :confused: The one in my car only comes on when you start the engine but it gets warm so quickly I don't mind.

    Peter
     
Loading...

Share This Page