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Do you ever replace central heating pipework

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by padstar, 24 Feb 2020.

  1. padstar

    padstar

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    As part of my full house refurbishment, i am replacing all of the rads. Almost all are staying in the same location as existing.

    The central heating pipework is 80% within the floor voids with some runs and most sections leading to the rads being surface run. I want all the surface stuff relocated within the floor voids and was originally thinking of having all of the pipework removed and replaced with new so that i know i have a new system installed to give piece of mind over the years.

    Does copper deteriorate over years (the existing system is ancient). When i have been removing the rads they are full of crud. If you dont recommend replacing all the pipework can they be thoroughly cleaned. We are not trying to save money by cutting corners, just dont want to spend money if it is not needed. We just want the job done right.

    What are the experts recommendations.
     
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  3. footprints

    footprints

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    As long as there are no issues with the cooper tube like pin-holeing due to poor quality tube, contact with corrosive brick, electrical shorts, copper will last a long time plenty has been in for 70 years or so.
    here are some "copper" pipes from the 70's (thanks to the Rhodesian declaration of independence) when copper supplies almost stopped, that are in fact steel coated with copper or tin so if you have copper that rusts get it out!
    If you want to reposition some rads it might be a good idea to go for a complete new system, the fitter will be more than pleased to "dispose" of any scrap cooper too!
    Otherwise a good flush and clean with perhaps new rad valves all round should be fine.(y)
     
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  4. stem

    stem

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    As has been said the copper pipe per-se will probably be fine.

    However, if the system was badly designed in the first place. For example, if the pipes are incorrectly routed or sized then you might consider changing them. Also heating system design has improved over the years, so if you have an antiquated 'one pipe system' upgrading it to a two pipe would be a good move. Or, if it's a system where a hot water cylinder is heated by gravity circulation, and only the central heating is pumped some upgrading would be advantageous.
     
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  5. Nige F

    Nige F

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    Also there could be dodgy soldered joints. A clean/flush won't hurt but I would (assuming it's cistern fed/open vent) Fill the system and cap the feed and vent, and pump up to 3.5 bar ( new pressurised c.h will discharge to vent @ 3 bar ) and leave for a couple of days to see any leaks/pressure drop. Hire a Rothenberger one for £40 a day or buy a cheaper one from amazon - then ebay it.
     
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  6. Nige F

    Nige F

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    The erstwhile Tru Wel - My first job as an apprentice was lagging the stuff with hair felt under a large Edwardian house. I still pass by the place regularly and wonder how long it lasted :unsure:
     
  7. padstar

    padstar

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    Thanks to all. I would say that the pipework was installed when wet central heating was introduced to residential houses. The heating system is gravity fed and some of the pipework i have uncovered looks like nothing i have seen before so i am moving towards the strip out and replace option. Guessing the materials will be as much if not more than the labor to install it.
     
  8. Doubt it
     
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