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Does this plan say whether the wall is load bearing?

Discussion in 'Building' started by WoOt, 5 Jul 2020.

  1. WoOt

    WoOt

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    Looking at removing the wall between the dining room and the kitchen (and possibly also moving the wall between kitchen/dining room back (in to the hallway, which is too large).

    Looking at these old plans, and especially the cross section, my guess is that the wall between kitchen/dining room is load bearing. But that the wall between kitchen and dining room probably isn't. Thoughts?

    Original plan:
    upload_2020-7-5_21-55-9.png

    Cross-section (unfortunately only showing dining room/hallway):
    upload_2020-7-5_21-57-2.png

    Complete floorplan:
    upload_2020-7-5_21-58-31.png
     

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  3. Between kitchen and dining room non load bearing, dining/ kitchen to hallway load bearing, at a guess lol
     
  4. big-all

    big-all

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    joists can still join on top even iff no wall above
     
  5. WoOt

    WoOt

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    Sorry @big-all, didn't get your comment. Could you clarify your comment, please?
     
  6. big-all

    big-all

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    if the floor timbers cross the wall they may be relying on the wall for support or even joined on the wall
     
  7. WoOt

    WoOt

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    Thanks for explaining. That makes total sense. So if the joists above run parallel to the wall it means it isn't load bearing?
     
  8. big-all

    big-all

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    yes very unusual for parallel joists to be connected support wise but make it a check if you can in case the very very unusual happens
     
  9. tony1851

    tony1851

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    From the builder's p.o.v, the easiest way would have been: joists running side-to-side across lounge, and front-to-back for the rest of the house, the joists overlapping on the 4½" wall running down the middle. Joists probably trimmed around the stairwell.
    If so, the wall between kitchen and dining could well be non-loadbearing.
    (Slightly o/t but those plans show just how complex modern building has become; reminds me of my time starting out, when drawings (and life) were simpler!).
     

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  11. frutbunn

    frutbunn

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    There's no way to be sure, NEVER trust a drawing, use this as a guide but always confirm it on site. What is drawn on a plan quite often is different to how it gets done on site. I've approved countless plans over the years knowing fine well that they will never be built that way. Some Architects have very peculiar impractical (expensive!) ideas.
    Most likely though the wall in question will be non load bearing but the only way to be sure is to check on site. This is actually quite easy to do either by looking at the direction of floor boarding above or by tapping the ceiling to detect the joists, you can actually get clever electronic devices to do this.
     
  12. WoOt

    WoOt

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    So if the floorboards run parallel to the wall (and as such perpendicular to the joists), then the wall isn't load bearing? Excellent. When it's non-load bearing you can just DIY remove it without any building regs or such, right? Or am I missing something?
     
  13. big-all

    big-all

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    the only way to know is to look
    if the floor board cross the wall then less likly to be a problem
    if the floor board run the length off the wall then lift all the planks on top off the wall and look
     
  14. frutbunn

    frutbunn

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    Thats correct
     
  15. tony1851

    tony1851

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    Not necessarily; a wall might not be supporting a gravity load (eg a wall or floor joists above) but it might be performing a buttresing function, providing lateral stability to the house as a whole, in which case a BR application would be needed.
    (This is unlikely to be an issue in the OPs house).
     
  16. frutbunn

    frutbunn

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    Its not an issue in this building, the walls aren't long enough to warrant a buttress wall. It isn't an issue.
     
  17. tony1851

    tony1851

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    Yes, that's what I wrote.
     
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