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Emulsion over oil based paint dilemma

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by L11223344, 26 Feb 2020.

  1. L11223344

    L11223344

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    Hello,

    I am repainting the woodwork in a house I've moved into. It looks like the original paint was oil based but unfortunately the previous owner painted everything in sight, walls and wood, in white emulsion (it is awful)!

    I’ve sanded it all down but a basic sand. So, what's left now is a mix of the emulsion, some of the original oil based paint and also a few bits of bare wood (there were lots of bumps and drips which I've sanded off and ended up going a bit too far) But is all has a 'key' due to the sanding.

    What on earth do I now paint on top of this? (internet research hasn’t helped much)

    Ultimately, I want the final finish to be oil based eggshell or satin finish.

    But what can I put on to start with, water based primer/undercoat or oil based? Having now read up on it, I'm worried that the fact there is still emulsion on there means whatever I put on top won’t stick properly and might peel off. Also, the small patches of bare wood, does this need wood primer first?

    New carpets going down soon so I need to get on with it asap and I don't think I have time to more sanding than I've already done (hallway, stairs, banisters and two bedrooms) Also, the rest of the house needs done after this (4 more rooms, hallway and lots of doors) so I’d really like to not have to sand everything back even more than I have done.

    I am totally stuck on what’s best to do, and boyfriend says hurry up and decide what we are doing (he’d just slap oil based top coat on and be done with it!)

    Apologies if my question has been answered somewhere before, I couldn't find any answers when I looked.

    I would be so grateful for any advice. Many thanks!!
     
  2. JohnD

    JohnD

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    how old is the house?

    can you guess how old the paint is?
     
  3. L11223344

    L11223344

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    Hi John,

    Thanks for your reply.

    Yes, the upstairs of the flat is 1980s, its the attic. And the rest is old, Victorian, so I am concerned about lead paint. I have only started decorating the 1980s part of the house so far.
     
  4. Nige F

    Nige F

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    look for Zinsser products on t'net;)
     
  5. L11223344

    L11223344

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    Thank you, I'll have a look.
     
  6. JohnD

    JohnD

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    old oil paint may be linseed oil based, especially if it seems very thick. It comes off nicely with a hot air gun. I don't know what the precautions are for possible lead fumes.

    edit
    here
    https://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cis79.pdf

    Modern paint strippers are not much good since they took out the carcinogens.
     
  7. opps

    opps

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    You can still buy methyl chloride paint stripper. It is supposed to be for "industrial use only" though.
     
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