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Extending wi-fi

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by john4703, 17 Sep 2018.

  1. john4703

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    I've just got a summerhouse and obviously it is on the ground next to my home. I live on the first floor and there is no wi-fi signal from my virgin router in the summerhouse.
    What is the best way to get a signal to the summerhouse? I'd rather not have to run a cable as that would be a massive amount of work. The electric power supply is in place and buried in concrete.
     
  2. Iamchamps

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    Depending how the power cable is connected power line adaptors may work. If not a better router with more coverage, even just a WiFi extender could do the job.
     
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  3. john4703

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    Two questions.
    1. The power cable from the room the router is in goes to the consumer unit and the power cable to the summerhouse is from a different RCCB in the consumer unit. I think all the cables are 2.5mm t&E.
    2. I've just googled wi-fi extender and that might work.
     
  4. Iamchamps

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    Ok I am not sure the power line adaptor option will work then, or if it does it might be a bit intermittent for connection. An extender could be the best idea. I personally went for an upgraded router. While Virgin internet is great (speed wise) the equipment they provide is quite basic so if you want a top of the range router you need to buy one. I spent £120 on a really good netgear router and the distance is probably double what the Virgin router was producing.
     
  5. ban-all-sheds

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    NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

    Those devices are dreadful, and are only "legal" because the manufacturers exploit a loophole in the certification process; they demonstrate that the device itself doesn't emit much interference and say that the interference subsequently emitted by the unshielded mains wiring is outside their responsibility. It's not unlike the situation with diesel engines that don't exceed emissions standards in lab tests but do on the road.

    If they do cause interference, then they are only "legal" to use if the user is unknowing - as soon as they are told that the device is causing problems then they are knowingly causing interference, and action can be taken against them.


    https://www.ban-plt.org.uk/

    https://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.p...te-owners-bad-powerline-network-adapters.html



    Seriously - these devices may be technically legal in the UK because of our weakly worded legislation, and people may in practice get away with ruining other people's lives because Ofcom refuse to step up to their responsibilities (see https://community.talktalk.co.uk/t5/TalkTalk-TV/powerline-adapters/td-p/1736914 and https://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/04/05/ofcom_plt_response/ [although things may have changed since that last article was published]), but no responsible person should ever recommend their use or use them.
     
  6. jonbey

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    I'd just run a cable. Better than wifi, and you don't have to send your signal across half the neighbourhood.

    I also use powerline adaptors, if they work, then why not?
     
  7. ban-all-sheds

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    Because they are dreadful, and are only "legal" because the manufacturers exploit a loophole in the certification process; they demonstrate that the device itself doesn't emit much interference and say that the interference subsequently emitted by the unshielded mains wiring is outside their responsibility. It's not unlike the situation with diesel engines that don't exceed emissions standards in lab tests but do on the road.

    If they do cause interference, then they are only "legal" to use if the user is unknowing - as soon as they are told that the device is causing problems then they are knowingly causing interference, and action can be taken against them.


    https://www.ban-plt.org.uk/

    https://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.p...te-owners-bad-powerline-network-adapters.html



    Seriously - these devices may be technically legal in the UK because of our weakly worded legislation, and people may in practice get away with ruining other people's lives because Ofcom refuse to step up to their responsibilities (see https://community.talktalk.co.uk/t5/TalkTalk-TV/powerline-adapters/td-p/1736914 and https://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/04/05/ofcom_plt_response/ [although things may have changed since that last article was published]), but no responsible person should ever recommend their use or use them.
     
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  8. jonbey

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    Has there been cases where interference has caused problems? All wifi is interference isn't it? If in this case it's mostly running through a cable buried in the garden, will it cause a problem?

    Curious to test my set up is not causing problems though... How do i do that?
     
  9. mattylad

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    Get a shortwave radio, hook it upto an antenna, scan through the bands looking for buzzing. Turn off your adapters and see if the noise goes away.
     
  10. bernardgreen

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    mattylad has suggested one way. I have used a medium wave receiver. It can also be heard in audio equipment

    Yes many, Hence the interest from OfCom Some ( threats of ) prosecutions have happened where the user continued to use the offending equipment after a formal warning to cease using it.

    WiFi is low power wireless communication on one or more assigned frequencies PowerLine and similar items create interference that is spread over a wide range of frequencies.

    That section of cable may not. all the wiring in the house will be able to radiate the interference.
     
  11. jonbey

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    I only have internet radio...
     
  12. jonbey

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    Interesting (just saw Bernard's update).
    I shall review my setup then.
     
  13. bernardgreen

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    But your neighbours probably have radios that will suffer interference from PowerLine and similar devices.
     
  14. Lower

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    Look at the BT whole home wifi mesh system. Its a wifi extending system but one that is reliable and just works, unlike wifi repeaters or range extenders.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/BT-seamless-connection-everywhere-complete/dp/B01NBMMVG7

    I went through a variety of powerline adaptors, wifi repeaters and wifi range extenders and none of them were reliable in the medium term.

    Alternatively, if you have sky, i believe the Sky q box acts as a reliable wifi repeater, albeit its speed is more limited than the BT system.
     
  15. motorbiking

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