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Fence Advice...

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by christianbeccy, 23 May 2018.

  1. christianbeccy

    christianbeccy

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    I'm wanting to put in a nice, high-quality, visually appealing fence.

    I know it's the most long-lasting, but I don't really want the boggo standard concrete posts and pre-made fence-panel solution.

    I'm thinking of placing thick posts (perhaps 8-10") at a spacing of around 2.5m, with planks (something like deck boards) running horizontally, but in a hit/miss fashion to give the same look from both sides and make it a little less prone to the wind. I've also considered placing a smaller, intermediate post halfway between the thicker posts to give some mid-span support to the slats.

    Can anyone point me towards somewhere I can get hold of some very thick wooden posts that are suitable for burying in the ground? ...and possibly also some nice options I can use for the slats?

    Help appreciated. :)
     
  2. Lower

    Lower

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    Hit and miss planks won't give you much reduction in wind loading.

    If you want to make the fence really long lasting, use concrete godfathers in the ground and bolt your fence posts to those. That will put the wooden part of the fence posts above ground so they shouldn't rot in the same way.
     
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  3. christianbeccy

    christianbeccy

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    That's good advice, I'll take a look. Not seen these before.

    I had planned to set the posts onto a gravel bed at the bottom of the hole, treat the underground portion heavily with a preservative and also add a ground-level run-off. If I use Oak posts, might this be sufficient?
     
  4. Notch7

    Notch7

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  5. christianbeccy

    christianbeccy

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    Aaaah, these look good. I guess these on oak posts with the gravel for drainage would give me a fighting chance.

    I fitted a couple of gate posts a while ago, I just treated the underground portion and a couple of inches above ground with a heavy-duty preservative (can't remember off the top of my head what it was, but it's a dark blue/purple colour).
     
  6. scbk

    scbk

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    The post sizing is a bit overkill, normally it would be 4x4" posts with a spacing of about 1.8m.

    You can get different timber posts, depends what is available locally and what your budget is. Heartwood of Larch is rot resistant, you can also get creosote treated posts, that last a long time
     
  7. christianbeccy

    christianbeccy

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    Yes, I realise overkill from a structural viewpoint, but it's to create the look I have in my head. I'll probably go for 200x200 posts, having looked around a bit.
     
  8. christianbeccy

    christianbeccy

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    Just as another point on this, I have to remove a 6ft Privet hedge (unfortunately after it appears to have randomly died). I guess once I've removed the hedge and roots, the ground won't be sufficiently compact to allow the installation of posts. I guess I'll need to fill the area with further substrate (soil) and compact with a whacker of some sort?
     
  9. JohnD

    JohnD

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    if it's dead, you can just cut off the stems at ground level (and if it isn't, dab glyphosate concentrate on the cut stumps and it soon will be)

    no need to dig it out.
     
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  10. Keithmac

    Keithmac

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    Ive just fitted 40 8 foot 100mm posts in 3 foot deep 200mm wide holes packed with gravel.

    The fence is incredibly sturdy and hopefully the gravel will increase drainage!.

    Concrete grandfather posts are a good idea.

    I wouldn't contemplate concreteing a wooden post in again after what I've had to contend with!..

    20180430_172342.jpg 20180525_195338.jpg
     
  11. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Exactly.
     
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  12. christianbeccy

    christianbeccy

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    Is it seriously a good, reliable, durable option NOT to concrete the posts in? I can see how it makes sense, but don't want to be contending with a wobbly fence in a couple of years.
     
  13. JohnD

    JohnD

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    it is a good idea not to put wooden posts in the ground where they will be damp and go rotten.

    concrete posts don't rot.
     
  14. Keithmac

    Keithmac

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    I had the option of carrying 40 concrete posts through the house and all over the garden or 40 wooden ones..

    I'm amazed how sturdy it is, no worries about it going anywhere.

    Worst case a few years down the line I'll have to re tamp them down but they seem even more solid now then when I put them in.

    Personally I don't like the look of concrete posts but there's no denying their longevity in damp soil..
     
  15. DIYnot Local

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