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fire rated Downlights building regs

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by Richard Caville, 28 Jan 2017.

  1. Ive been looking at the fire rated downlights in screwfix catalogue for a garage part conversion into a craft room - it is an integrated garage with door into bungalow....building regs parts B, C, E, L1 & L2 are quoted on various lights at different prices. The loft gives access to the lights and the cabling when lights are fitted into holes in ceiling, & obviously an electrician will check & connect it all.

    Dont want to spend a fortune but need to get correct rating & depth. Which compliant light will be suitable for this?

    Thanks
     
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  3. omega015

    omega015

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    The Aurora downlights seem to cover most reg with a wide variety of choice (not the cheapest though but good quality). However just go onto the screwfix website and they have plenty of fire rated etc... ones to choose from.
     
  4. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Yes, obviously.

    Does he know yet that he is going to do that?

    Does the nature of the conversion you are doing mean you need Building Regulations approval or Planning Permission?


    Have you considered Plan B - not using lights which need you to cut holes in the ceiling?
     
  5. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Do you need fire rated?

    Are downlights suitable for a craft room?

    Are holes in the ceiling to a loft area a good idea?
     
  6. ColJack

    ColJack

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    It's been a while since I've peeked at the regs but I thought that fire rated were only needed in a ceiling used as a fire barrier such as a kitchen or actual garage.. where combustion might occur..?
    If the garage is being converted into habitable space does it still need to be fire rated?
    I know loft conversions tend to be because of escape routes etc but a ( presumably ) ground floor room?
     
  7. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Possibly/probably a garage with accommodation above it. However, beyond that, I thought that the requirement for fire-barrier ceilings/floors was when they were between different dwellings (e.g. flats).

    In a new build, or when work is done which requires non-electrical BC approval, if the ceiling is below a loftspace or roof, there could well be issues in relation to thermal insulation when one installs recessed lights - and I think it can be a bit of a 'double whammy' in that the requirements for thermal insulation and the need to avoid overheating light fittings have the potential to come into conflict with one another.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  8. Planning permission not needed; might need BC check.
    Plan B being considered, but wife would like downlights.

    No reason why not in a craft room, as well as window.
    Its a bungalow with integrated garage, and Theres downlights in kitchen, and insulation all across loft ....so it got permission on new build. So as long as one uses the enclosed type of fire rated downlights, there shouldnt be a problem...it was built 16 years ago (we are not original owners/builders), and its a very warm bungalow!

    Thanks for posts, but No one has yet answered my question.....
    B, C, E, L1, L2....! some of the enclosed fire rated are just B, others multi....some of those will be for bathrooms etc. But is B rated enough?
     
  9. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    If fire rated is not required, then anything will do, won't it?
     
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  11. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    As I said/implied, the purpose of 'fire-rated downlights' is to prevent spread of fire from the room below to whatever is above the ceiling. If that is only a loft/roof, then (although I may be wrong) I can't see that there would be any requirement for fire-rated lights.

    However, as I also said, there might be issues in relation to thermal insulation if one cuts holes in the ceiling and has to 'push insulation out of the way'.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  12. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Part B. Fire safety
    Part C. Site preparation and resistance to contaminants and moisture
    Part E. Resistance to the passage of sound
    Part L. Conservation of fuel and power

    Bear in mind some significant things about "fire rated" lights.

    1. There's no reason why they should be any more tolerant of being covered in insulation than normal ones.
    2. If you use halogen ones they still get hot and can damage things near/touching them.
    3. They contain intumescent components which swell up and close off paths through the light when there is a fire. Under normal circumstances there's no guarantee that they don't have gaps for moisture, draughts etc to pass through.
     
  13. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    I assume this is an integrated garage, and not a separate building?

    It very much depends on where you live. Planning approval may be needed if you live in a conservation area, for instance.

    Even if PLANNING consent is not needed, the conversion of a garage into a living space is a “change of use” of part of a building. An application for approval under the Building Regulations must be made before work commences. The submission of a Building Notice is an appropriate way to achieve this.

    Best bet is to contact your LABC to check.
     
  14. DetlefSchmitz

    DetlefSchmitz

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    My neighbour, who converted a garage into a room, was required by BC to plaster with fireproof ceiling boards, in case a later owner ever converted in back to a garage.
     
  15. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I'm a bit confused by that. I was under the impression that "Change of use" was a Planning matter which normally would require planning permission - and which (although it quite often will) does not necessarily interest LABC at all?

    Kind Regards, John
     
  16. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Was there something, other than a roof or roofspace, above that garage?

    Kind Regards, John
     
  17. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    Mostly.... the conversion of a garage to living accommodation does not require planning permission and will be regarded as “Permitted Development”.

    However in some cases “permitted development” rights were removed when planning permission was granted for the original construction of houses. In these circumstances Planning Permission will be required before you can carry out a garage conversion.
    It is therefore (as i said) important that you check with the Council’s Development Control section whether planning permission is required for your proposal.

    In any case a Building notice needs to be raised.
     
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