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Firebird oil boiler any good?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Roger465, 2 Jan 2018.

  1. Roger465

    Roger465

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    So one or two of you may have read my older thread about getting my boiler replaced. The plumber recommended a Firebird (in the garage, non-combi oil) and it heats the house just fine, though heavy on the oil.

    However, I’ve checked with a couple of other people who have Firebirds, and their consumption is similar to mine. My cousin, who also has one in England, reckoned Firebirds were the best… anyway, I had a different plumber round today to look at putting in proper heating controls, new rads/TRVs. Room stat etc etc.

    He didn’t actually throw up when he saw the boiler – I asked him what was up, and he said they were a heap of sh***, worst in the world, and I should have got a Grant.

    Any plumbers have any opinions on this, based on actual experience?

    Thanks :D
     
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  3. oilhead

    oilhead

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    Heat only Firebird is not bad. Excessive consumption will be down to lack of controls, not boiler.
     
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  4. Terrywookfit

    Terrywookfit

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    Not my favourite but it will use the same amount of oil as a a Grant or Worcester
    does.
    Many use RDB burners.
    They are all same efficiency on new boilers.
    My choice would have been a Grant!!
     
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  5. muggles

    muggles

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    Every Firebird I've ever seen has been dripping water out of every conceivable orifice...I wouldn't touch one with a bargepole. Having said that, I have to agree with oilhead that your high consumption is more likely to be down to your controls/flow temperatures etc than the boiler itself, unless it's been badly commissioned but then you'd expect to see it getting sooty. Interesting to note that Firebird don't obviously quote their efficiency figures anywhere though, so maybe they aren't as efficient as some others.

    My preference is Hounsfield, and I've got one in my own house
     
    Last edited: 2 Jan 2018
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  6. Roger465

    Roger465

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    Thanks guys – well, no water dripping that I can see. Oh, and no black smoke :rolleyes:



    At the moment, everything but the boiler (and pump) are 25 or more years old – the tank is heated all the time the rads are on, there’s no stat in the house, nor on the tank, etc etc.



    Week after next, I’m getting proper insulation in the attic, modern controls & stats fitted to the system etc. Muggles – I know we discussed this a bit on my other thread, but I’ve asked around a bit now. My parents just down the road (3 bed house) have the same new boiler, keep records of things, and they’re getting through 2700-3600L of oil a year, depending on the weather :eek:



    Course, rest of their system is still ancient like mine – everything controlled by the hot water etc. And they need the house a bit hotter than mine – but probably only a couple of degrees in it…
     
  7. muggles

    muggles

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    Hopefully you can get that under control a bit, that's four times what I use!
     
  8. srhawksy

    srhawksy

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    They're offering up to ten year warranties of you're a registered fitter, so they must have some faith. I've fitted loads through the eco scheme and they seem ok.... Although the past few have been a bit high on CO. I'm not an oil expert, would high CO cause sooting eventually?
     
  9. muggles

    muggles

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    How good are they at honouring that warranty though I wonder? High CO will definitely cause sooting, you should aim for less than 20ppm on commissioning
     
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  11. srhawksy

    srhawksy

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    Flipping heck! Some have been a pain to get under 100 ppm! Firm I've been subbing to says under 100 is fine but the less the better!
     
  12. muggles

    muggles

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    When are you measuring them? They can take a good 30 minutes to an hour after first firing to burn off the manufacturing oils and settle down. Try to adjust them during that time and you'll end up with incorrect settings
     
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  13. oilboffin

    oilboffin

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    I thought it was high co2caused sooting high co means too much air and less efficiency.Bob
     
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  14. oilhead

    oilhead

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    High CO2 causes soot, but high CO will often cause localised deposits around the blast tube which can eventually affect combustion and cause soot.
    20 ppm is good to achieve, but many boilers are difficult to get less than 35 or so, with Worcesters often up to 50. Tight baffling can distort flame to cause a little impingement so increasing CO.
     
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  15. Roger465

    Roger465

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    Yeah, here's hoping. As I probably mentioned in the previous thread, this is a large bungalow (land is cheaper here, so they built out rather than up), with a VERY big, poorly-insulated attic. So hopefully, that combined with proper control of the boiler with a stat etc will make a fair difference.

    What I'm hoping to do is visit a house like maybe a year old or something with a similar boiler, and see if I can find out what their bill is like!
     
  16. srhawksy

    srhawksy

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    Normally try and wait until flue is up to tempo as per Manus instructions etc.. being honest we're getting pushed for time by the end of the day etc.
     
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