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Fitting architrave after plastering

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by yod9999, 23 Sep 2021.

  1. yod9999

    yod9999

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    Hi all. First post here, hoping for a bit of advice :)

    We are currently renovating a bedroom, so have stripped off all the skirting and architrave to be replaced. We then had a plasterer come in to skim the walls. I asked him if I should fit the new skirting and architrave first and he said better not to, but now we are left with the situation where the plaster protrudes further from the walls and the door frame and in some places overlaps the wood of the door frame.


    Clearing the plaster off the door frame should be fairly easy, but I'm not sure of the best way to go about fitting the architrave. I can think of 3 possible options

    • Just put the architrave on top of the plaster, accept there'll be a gap between the architrave and doorframe, and caulk it. This seems like a bad idea - the architrave probably won't sit straight, and there will likely be variations in the size of the gap.
    • Somehow create a 2-3mm thick strip of wood the same width as the doorframe, and use this to space the architrave away from the existing doorframe so that it's not sitting on the plaster
    • Mark a line on the plaster showing where the architrave will extend to horizontally (for the vertical parts of the architrave) and sand back the plaster to the level of the door frame allowing the architrave to fit flush against the doorframe, and then tidy up where the architrave meets the plaster with some caulk
    Any suggestions as to the best way to deal with this?

    Thanks

    Neil
     
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  3. Bonni

    Bonni

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    When the plaster protrudes in front, you sit the architrave in place and mark down the outside edge and cut away the plaster from the door frame up to that line.
     
  4. sparkwright

    sparkwright

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    All three options are correct, you will have to select the best option.

    A fourth option, very similar to the second option - fit a thin strip to the door frame, but rather than line it up with the edge of the door lining, line it up with the edge of the architrave instead.

    May be a less obvious join.

    All comes down to your personal preference.
     
  5. yod9999

    yod9999

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    Thanks for replies, very useful. Option 4 sounds like a good one too

    Does anyone know where it's possible to buy 2mm strip wood? Most places don't seem to go thinner than 4 or 6mm
     
  6. sparkwright

    sparkwright

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    I believe you can get 3mm plywood sheets, you may well be able to get 2mm, I don't know.

    This could be cut into strips.

    Some B&Queue stores have a cutting service.
     
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  8. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    Take a piece of architrave, mark on the plaster where it will sit, then with a strong straight edge (spirit level?) Score the plaster several times with a stanley knife.
    Then chip the bit where the architrave will go and it will all sit flush.
    For the skirting you'll have another task, because where it joins the architrave, it will protrude by a few mm.
    You could use a planer or sander to chamfer the ends so to make it flush.
     
  9. daggermark

    daggermark

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    Had to do this a few times. I always go for option 3. I'd scrape the worst of it off with a sharp utility scraper, being careful not to jab at it too much or you'll get bits flaking off.
     
  10. yod9999

    yod9999

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    Thanks again for all the suggestions, I'm hoping to tackle this this weekend. Will post results...
     
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  11. mrrusty

    mrrusty

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    The best tool for this is actually a multitool I've found. You can run it once down the side of the temporarily pinned arch, making a cut a few mm deep, and then with the same blade just slice in from the side level with the casing. You get a neat cutaway and the arch fits neatly into place.

    From the little I can see in the pictures, it's a period house, if you end up with the skirt sticking out more than the architrave, you could consider using plinth blocks. Some people don't like them - your call.
     
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