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Flooring height issue

Discussion in 'Floors, Stairs and Lofts' started by kevinsmbuk, 17 Jul 2021.

  1. kevinsmbuk

    kevinsmbuk

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    I now have an open plan L shaped kitchen diner which is fairly large, the kitchen area is tiled and the dining area is parquet flooring. The parquet is about 5mm lower than the tiles.

    I want to run maybe LVT flooring across both floors with no threshold strip (too wide), is there a way to bring the parquet up to the same level as the tiles?

    Also, I presume there is no way to tile over parquet, as it's not a good subfloor?

    I was thinking that perhaps my only option was to lift the tiles in the kitchen, self leveller, then LVT over the lot.
     
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  3. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    Taking up the tiles seems like the easiest of the options.

    I'm not sure how well lvt goes over tiles, I'd have thought you would see all the lumps of tile joins,
     
  4. kevinsmbuk

    kevinsmbuk

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    Yeah thats what I was thinking, presume there is no way to overtile parquet?
     
  5. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    Not sure about tiling, but can put laminate or lvt over the top no problem.

    It's quite common to see this in old houses
     
  6. crazydaze

    crazydaze

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    what material are the tiles?

    you certainly can't lay LVT over the Parquet. Depending on the subfloor, you can lift the parquet, basecoat and screed or ply the area to slightly higher than the tiles and then (assuming the tiles are ceramic etc) Primer and Screed the tiles to the old parquet area.

    Or lift the Parquet and tiles and assuming its a concrete floor with a DPM, screed the whole area level to fit the LVT.

    There are alot of other considerations including age of the property etc.
     
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  7. kevinsmbuk

    kevinsmbuk

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    [​IMG]
    Picture of tiles above.

    Why can't you lay LVT over parquet? I have done in my lounge and its fine. It's the click stuff not stick down.

    It's a 60s house. The sub floor is concrete.

    Think the bitumen that's used to stick may act as a DPM?
     
  8. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    We've always been told to add a layer of thin ply over parquet if it is staying put (something I've done on listed buildings where the parquet needed to be conserved, but a modern finished floor was required). A sheet of ply is relatively immobile. An area of parquet on the other hand is made up of a large number of individual pieces, not normally mechanically linked in any way, which can move with changes in their environment (which is why a lot of older parquet floors have the odd loose block which detached from the bitumen). Stick anything directly onto parquet and you are courting trouble and (if you are in trade) callbacks - and no tradesman likes call backs to fix stuff. Fair play to you, you got away with it this time but your luck may not hold in the future
     
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  10. Captain Nemesis

    Captain Nemesis

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    Sounds like a good way to spoil two honest floors.
     
  11. dazlight

    dazlight

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    As dave said about you can’t put LVT over parquet. It will cause it to blow and all the parquet will lift.
     
  12. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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  13. dazlight

    dazlight

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  14. kevinsmbuk

    kevinsmbuk

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    Great that's £500 odd wasted! I'm really surprised I missed this as I usually do lots of investigation first before beginning any work. How long until the trouble begins? i.e. blocks start to lift. Should it happen quickly as the flooring has been down for over a year with no issues. It's the Novocore stuff from wickes.

    If you lift the blocks, then you are left with the sticky bitumen underneath which can be a bit uneven what happens then? use self leveller over? or ply, if so what thickness?
     
  15. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    You never know. As I said, you might get away with it, especially as the parquet is a lot newer then the stuff I've dealt with (80 to 150 years old on the main) and yours is.likely to be in far better condition, but when you come to replace it in the future (assuming you don't sell the house first) you should consider your moves carefully.

    As to sticky, no. Until relatively recently parquet was often laid into hot bitumen which sets absolutely solid. If it neefscto be removed it can sometimes require a heavy (9kg) breaker or even a road breaker to get it out (quickly). As it is generally 1-1/2 to 2in thick (modern stuff is a lot thinner), so the voids get filled with plywood, a liquid DPM is applied (assuming the floor beneath is dry) and it is then built to level with a self levelling screed. If the underlying floor is showing signs of damp a proper DPM needs to go into the floor to start with
     
    Last edited: 21 Jul 2021 at 8:38 PM
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