Galvanised water tank

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Hi all, I have a few galvanised water tanks like this which I'm using to store outside rain water.
Now some of the insides have rusted up considerably, will the water still be ok to use for watering plants and to fill the odd kettle occasionally?
Is there something I can paint over the top of the rusted surface after removing the rust, to get it in good condition, or will this be harmful ? Keep in mind I intend to keep water in it at all times, so I wouldn't want whatever I paint on to leach into the water.
Thanks for any help and information
 
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buy plastic tanks.

Galvanising erodes away when exposed to weather. When your tanks were in the loft they might have had a crust of limescale to protect them, but the zinc plate is not very thick, and if they are already rusty, they are at risk of perforating.

I have some pics of old galvanised roofing somewhere.
 
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Fine for watering plants, but certainly not for your kettle for a cuppa (if that was what you had in mind).
 
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will the water still be ok to use for watering plants
Possibly

and to fill the odd kettle occasionally?
No

Is there something I can paint over the top of the rusted surface after removing the rust, to get it in good condition,
No.

Rust means the galvanising has already gone. It can't be fixed or repaired. The rust will continue until there is nothing left.
If you attempt to remove the rust, you will probably find there is nothing else underneath.
 
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I would be tempted to sell those tanks.
There are some complete idiots, - sorry, arty type people, who convert those into tables or other ‘interesting’ items and pay silly money. (y)
 
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Ok.
I notice that toolstation sell a zinc primer spray. Why wouldn't this be suitable ?

If this tank was still in the loft and being used for storing water but it had the same type of damage, what would the options be then?

If I wanted to boil the water in a kettle in the shed I would use the water. If the tank is covered to stop rats and birds from getting at it, I can't see why it would be any more dangerous than the chlorinated water from the mains water supply which seems to give me the runs.
 
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A dark-colored plastic butt, with a lid to keep sunlight out, will not grow much algae, but there may be insect larvae, bird droppings and drowned wildlife.

You can filter and boil it if you want to drink it.
 
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Ok.
I notice that toolstation sell a zinc primer spray. Why wouldn't this be suitable ?

If this tank was still in the loft and being used for storing water but it had the same type of damage, what would the options be then?

If I wanted to boil the water in a kettle in the shed I would use the water. If the tank is covered to stop rats and birds from getting at it, I can't see why it would be any more dangerous than the chlorinated water from the mains water supply which seems to give me the runs.

Your best option if it were in a house, would be to replace it with a modern plastic tank.

Yes you can cover the tank, but you are still collecting the dirt, bird dropping from the roof where the rain water is collected from. No one in their right mind drinks stored water from a tank, even if that tank is in a house and covered. The only sensible (for most people) source of potable drinking water, comes straight from a cold tap, fed straight from the mains.
 
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Your best option if it were in a house, would be to replace it with a modern plastic tank.

Yes you can cover the tank, but you are still collecting the dirt, bird dropping from the roof where the rain water is collected from. No one in their right mind drinks stored water from a tank, even if that tank is in a house and covered. The only sensible (for most people) source of potable drinking water, comes straight from a cold tap, fed straight from the mains.

Water goes down your gullet into your stomach which produces stomach acid and where mostly everything is annihilated. If a bird poos on a roof and a little effluent from it dribbles down the guttering into a 100+ litre tank I fail to see how this is going to harm you. Covering the water is essential I would agree. I've seen birds using them as baths and rats sometimes running along the edges and peeing in them. I don't see the danger of a bit of dirt. Keep in mind the water is boiled before use when I make tea.
I feel there's an unreasonable fixation on the drinking water side of things. I've done it a few times and haven't died lol
Furthermore, what about the contaminates and all sorts of weird chemicals you may ingest through tap water? What about fluoride, heavy metals, chlorine, liquid plastic.. all of this junk is in our drinking water anyway lol
Anyway.., thanks for the suggestions everyone. I may sell these afterall and use the money to buy an IBC instead. The hope was that I could give these tanks a second life but I may use the ones that are water tight and sell the ones that aren't.
 
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Years ago people who were not on mains water would collect rain water in a covered tank and drink it with no problems, though I guess they probably boiled it first. These days we are less exposed to bugs and no longer have so much immunity.

You said, "I feel there's an unreasonable fixation on the drinking water side of things. I've done it a few times and haven't died."

If you feel you have the immunity then go ahead.

Things like fluoride and chlorine are added to tap water for good reason. British and European tap water is some of the safest in the world. It is better than the plastic bottled stuff that costs more than petrol in your local shop.
 
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