Garden office blocking light from nextdoors house

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Hi All,
I need some advice on an issue thats recently developed between ourselves and our neighbor.

Bit of a long story but here goes:-
- we have a link detached house which is offset by 3m with next door
- next door decided to build a pergola right across the rear of their house and have it fitted with a poly carbonate roof
- we then decided to build a similar pergola half of which is attached to next-doors side wall (3m) and the other half (3m) is supported by 100mm wooden posts. The pergola was built on a new concrete slab some 6 inches thick. And a triple wall poly-carbonate roof added.
- One year later during lock down we decided to convert the pergola to a garden building/office attached to the main house.
- The construction involved adding 2x4 stud-work, OSB outside, 75mm PIR insulation, breathable outer membrane & cladding on top. The floor was insulated with 75mm polystyrene & chipboard flooring. A DPM was installed under the floor insulation and under the plasterboard which lined the inner.
- the overall dimensions of the new building are 6m deep (away from the house), 3m wide and 3m high. Its built right next to the border.
- there are no electrics or other utilities in the room, its just intended for storage, workshop etc.

The other day the neighbor came round for a quick chat and we went in to his garden to view our construction from his side. He was keen to avoid and disputes and keep on good terms but had a couple of issues as follows:-
- he said that the new construction was blocking light and wind from his pergola/house
- he was worried about the structural integrity
- he was concerned our new building might affect the future sale of his house.

He mentioned that he was going to contact the council planning office for advice so my worry is what will happen next.

As far as I can see our building is within the planning law which allow single storey extension of this size.

Although I understand his point about loss of light, the fact is that there was already a 2m high fence in place and the beams of the existing pergola were 150mm, so the loss of light would be an area approx 0.85m x 3m.

In terms of structural integrity I believe we have a solid building using the standard stud-work and OSB. We haven't attached anything to his wall other that the beam used to support the rafters for the original pergola.

So I'm wondering what the Council planning office will do in this circumstance?

All thoughts and comments welcome.
 
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he said that the new construction was blocking light and wind from his pergola/house

Not a planning expert at all.

However, there was a failed planning application the previous owners of my house made. It would have resulted in a 3 story brick wall a meter away from the neighbours house - totally covering all their side windows (they have 2 story house).

Would have covered hall, bathroom and side kitchen windows and back door.

This was not a concern to the planners, who recommended the plans pass. Apparently as it didn't cut light from main habitable rooms, the loss of light wasn't a thing.

Apparently the ither neighbours objections about it devaluing their house also isnt a planning thing.

As far as "structural integrity" goes - no idea. It is your house and garden structure. Unsure if building regs apply but reckon you can ignore him
 
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If your office building confirms to permitted development, then the neighbour and planners can do jack.

As for structural integrity, then that's one of fact. It is or or isn't.
 
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Thanks for the replies, I went round to speak with the neighbor and gave him a list of exactly how we had constructed the building together with some pictures.

In order to get more light into his garden & house I suggested that I was willing to cut down some smallish trees on our side of the boundary which over shadow his property.

I mentioned that in retrospect we should have given details of our plans in advance and that we were very sorry and keen to make amends.

I think the neighbor is now reasonably happy and the moral of the story is always consult with neighbors first.
 

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