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Garden room Eaves height/base

Discussion in 'Building' started by 23vc, 16 Mar 2021.

  1. 23vc

    23vc

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    Appreciate this has probably been addressed before, but planning a garden room at some stage and plan to build up to floor height in masonry and pour slab ending up 150mm above outside ground level. Then build timber frame on top, osb, cladding etc, and stick within the max 2.5m eaves height with a flat roof. When chatting to others about doing a few courses of brickwork for the base, I seem to get blank looks. Does anyone actually do it this way? For me it makes sense and you’ve got your nice insulated slab and neat brick plinth as for a traditional masonry build.
    Also how’s the timber frame attached to the dpc brickwork, bolted? Or something set into concrete?
    Cheers!
     
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  3. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    What you propose is standard. The sole plate can be fixed through the DPC no problem with some through-bolts or suchlike - I recall a BRE document indicating that the puncture makes no difference to the DPC's effectiveness, but you can squirt some silicone or suchlike around the hole if you like.

    The fixings are only really to stop the frame moving horizontally, not to hold it down, so don't need to be massive.
     
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  4. 23vc

    23vc

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    Thanks. Given its being cladded, I assume the reason people tend to do timber frame and not insulated masonry walls, is to save a bit of space on wall thickness? Or is it just cos it’s easier for DIYers to lug timber around and bang it together? I’d more than happily do it in single skin/cavity blockwork if need be.
     
  5. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    There is a lot of confusion with timber frames. Many people think "shed" so don't want them, and many others just don't know how to detail it properly to make it last as long as any masonry wall.
     
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  7. 23vc

    23vc

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    I guess if done properly, timber frame (as opposed to blockwork) is normally the way to go for these as you’ll end up with overall thinner walls with comparable insulation?
     
  8. 23vc

    23vc

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    Finger in the air, any thoughts on how deep I need to dig the trench for the brickwork to dpc? I’m kinda hoping to get away with less than the standard 1m for a brick building? Moving any soil away will be a b4ll ache, not that that’s an excuse. The soil is pretty compact sand
     
  9. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Its not just the load but the stability of a deeper foundation, so you are still looking at least 600mm as long as the soil between 600 and 1000 is still the same type.
     
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  10. 23vc

    23vc

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    Yep thought that’d be the case. Might look at alternative shed base type options then but they’ll probably be more hassle than digging a trench, which at least I know how to do and have done many times before :)
     
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