Gazebo Overhang

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I built a decked area with a gazebo above it. I laid 18mm ply on the top with felt which lips over the edges by about 6". Unfortunately I didn't calculate the overhang right. As a result of this, driving rain gets into the gazebo from all sides. Currently it's soaking wet. I'm a bit gutted about it and I'm worried the timber will start rotting too.

I cannot figure out the best way to create an overhang on the existing set up (see pic). I want to be able to add to the existing structure rather than rip up the entire roof and re-lay.

My only feasible idea would be to have a 12" deep run of ply all around the edge of the roof at an angle (with felt) -- water would run off the existing roof onto this and then away from the structure. It would also stop rain driving into it.

Can anybody help restore some sanity with a few ideas? This is too mentally taxing for a Sunday sat indoors... I've been sat in the kitchen for nearly an hour thinking of ideas :confused:

IMG_2287.JPG
 
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Looks well built and solid - nice work.
I hope I've understood your issue correctly, but from your photo the gazebo looks to be pretty well protected by trees on three sides, and maximum exposure to rainfall is from the front. Even if you increased your overhang by a foot or two (which can start to look daft) it still wont remain bone dry underneath when wind gets involved. I'd suggest you ensure the timber is looked after with weatherproof treatment every couple of years and accept that a gazebo is only really intended to protect from the sun and light rain showers
 
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Thanks for the comment. It's constructed of 9" x 2" joists with the same joists used as floorboards too. The posts are made from 5" x 4" timber -- all of it being reclaimed from builder's yards. The joists were coated in boiled linseed oil by me and they are 1' off the ground so we don't get rats/mice nesting. The floorboards are coated in oil/stain.

I don't know if the overhang needs to be as much as 2', I just know I need it increasing from current but I don't know the best method! I was down there today and watched the rain coming in from all sides defeating the purpose of having a roof. There are only trees to the rear and (less so) to the right. There are no trees at the front and left and if I'm honest the trees that are there only offer light protection as most are not evergreen.

The ground can flood underneath because everything rests on concrete blocks -- I just want to make sure the rain doesn't get in as it is now.
 
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I have a similar problem, but more wind blowing rain onto the veranda of my home built summer house from 30 years ago. It has a wall 8 feet back from the roof, but the rain gets blown onto the wall up to a height of 5 feet. Best Idea I could think of, was to add some of that ground sheet attached to the front edge of roof, then draped down over the floor, to help protect when not being used, but I never implemented the idea. I thought with the amount of wind we get here, a sheet wouldn't last very long. The floor is slowly rotting, but I will repair it when needed.

Main thing seems to be, make sure no wood contacts the soil and ensure plenty of air can get in to dry it off when it does get wet.
 
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How about really big wooden Venetian blinds.
You can open them on sunny days and close them on wet ones. :)
 
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I have a similar problem...
Main thing seems to be, make sure no wood contacts the soil and ensure plenty of air can get in to dry it off when it does get wet.

Yes the timber is a good 10"-12" off the floor resting on concrete blocks so should dry out, but ideally I want no water contact at all.

On my drive in this morning I was wondering about overlaying corrugated sheets. Looks expensive but will allow an overhang and will last longer than felt anyway.
 
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Or if not, would a fascia board around the perimeter of the top stop rain getting in?
 
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Anything you can add to the sides to deflect the driven rain, will help, but the only way to keep it completely dry, is to completely surround it roof to floor.
 
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Decided I'm just going to put the equivalent of a porch canopy on the front. At least this stops rain getting in the most exposed opening.

Thanks for the tips and advice.
 
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Gazebos only offer limited protection from weather, if you want full protection build a shed.
 

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As the back and sides are obscured, why not put gutters on? That'll had some width and draw most water away.

Solid blinds is a nice idea too.
 
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https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Multipac...hash=item340b64d753:m:mGKj-06ZAOiOyCxn23U_Bzw

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/CLASSIC-...ABRICATION-CURTAINS-12-FT-X-9-FT/302876922571

you can get proper external outdoor blinds that turn verandas /gazebos into enclosed areas but most will be commercial based and expensive.

if you could coat with preservative, and store indoors in winter, cane/bamboo blinds might work? I made six blinds for my conservatory that slide along wires to provide shade, They wouldn't survive outside though.
 
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They do look nice I'll agree with you there, but I think they'll be a bit of a faff.

I managed to get my hands on some reclaimed 5mm clear acrylic. I'll put a canopy around the sides and back and then a ply/felt one at the front all supported by timber supports. Slightly at an angle to divert rain away.

There is guttering at the back (I made the roof slope 4" over the span and the run off does go into this), but the driving rain still gets in. If I cut the acrylic to a depth of 16" it means there will be a substantial overhang which I hope will stop most of the rain.

info-graphic-about-large-overhangs-868x475.jpg

Thanks for all the ideas. Just need some dry weather to get it done...
 

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