Good Reasonably Priced 1/2" Router

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by Revin Kevin, 15 Oct 2020.

  1. Revin Kevin

    Revin Kevin

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    I am looking for a new router for mainly fitting worktops. I had a screwfix/Erbauer one for a good few years and was very pleased with it. When it died recently I bought another but it burnt out on the first worktop I used it on got it swapped and used it a few times until it too started smoking and smelling so took it back for a refund. Now I need a replacement but for obvious reasons will steer clear of screwfix/Erbauer. I have a budget of about £150 any recommendations?
     
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  3. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    If you are fitting multiple worktops that sort of implies that you are trade. In that case maybe you should be looking for a trade rated tool as opposed to a DIY tool. deWalt have their DW625, which a number of firms are offering about the £230 mark. Not the best router in the world, but not a bad tool either (I use two of the predecessor models Elu MOF177s and I have owned a DW625, which was replaced by a Festool OF2200e). TBH I doubt there is a single heavy duty router (and worktops require a heavy duty router), 1/4 in or 1/2in at the price point you want
     
  4. big-all

    big-all

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    the nearest you will find is the hitachi m12v at any where between around £160-£175 ish but fluctuates
     
  5. Ryler

    Ryler

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    The Hitachi M12 V2 (hikoki now) is OK.
    We have four of them at work. The thread lock gives a lot of trouble and not the easiest used.
    The 110v version is useless.
     
  6. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Used one a few years back. Struck me as being absolutely huge. Thought they were a similar price to the DW625.

    BTW, what is the problem with the 110 volt version. Is it limited to 16A start up load (so 1600 to 1800 watts max)?
     
  7. Ryler

    Ryler

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    Very under powered.
    We do a lot of profile routing and its not worth taking out of the box.
     
  8. big-all

    big-all

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  9. Notch7

    Notch7

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  11. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Oh look! It's not an Erbauer with a different coat on is it? :eek:

    I always think.that if they don't or won't offer a 110volt version then it probably can't stand up to trade use. Only saying....
     
  12. Ryler

    Ryler

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    110v is shyte. Too underpowered.
    Our 110v tools in the workshop sit in the corner gathering dust.
     
  13. Ryler

    Ryler

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    Then don't say it.
    Because its nonsense.
    The rule here is 110v for site use. In germany and most of europe they use 240v on site.
    Because its totally safe and exceeds the efficiency of 110v crap by a country mile.
     
  14. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Yet more unsubstantiated nonesense - 230 volt tools are not more powerful than their 110 volt equivalents in most cases (see below). 110 volts is required for site use in the UK on safety grounds, but part of the issue we have here is that site management don't understand the need to have enough transformers of sufficient capacity on site (and to power lighting from its' own discrete transformers). Another issue is that a lot of trades (I'd say the vast majority from my own experience) simply don't understand the need for sufficiently large cross section cables to power their tools; if you are using a high starting load tool (such as a 3HP compressor) at the end of a 30 metres cable that is never going to work with a 2.5mm cross section wire - you need to invest in a 6mm cross section 32A one instead. Same goes for heavy routers - the startup/heavy run load of a 2000watt plus router really requires a 4mm 16A or better a 4mm 32A cable. If you don't have that your big router can run like a ruptured duck because of voltage drop along the length of the cable. A small part of the issue with some makers is that they reduce the output of the 110 volt motors over that of the 230 volt motors, possibly because can't get a sufficiently big motor inside the housing (Bosch do this on a couple of their saws, for example). Your Hitachi probably has the same issue (1600 watts down from 2200 watts? I did ask but you didn't give a sensible answer, as per usual). Face it, if 110 or 115 volts was the problem then every tradesman in the USA would be up in arms and clamouring for 230 volts - but they aren't, are they

    I have worked in a few European countries where 230 volts is used on sites (Spain, Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands) and some of the tricks I've seen used to overcome the tendency of RCDs to trip when conditions are not optimal are frankly hair raising - getting a belt of 230 whilst standing on a wet concrete floor is potentially lethal whereas 55 volts (110 volt supplies are centre tapped so +55/-55) is probably not going to off you

    The comment about offering tools in 110 volts is from long experience - 110 volt tools are site tools and need to be durable with parts backup. Firms only offering 230 volt either can''t be arsed and don't want the USA market (e.g Mafell, Festool) or in many cases their tools aren't up to the environment
     
    Last edited: 16 Oct 2020
  15. big-all

    big-all

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    2000w at 230v is 8.7amp
    2000w at 110v is 18.2amp
    so down rating a 110v machine may be to keep it within a certain cable or transformer size for convenience as in 1760w is 16 amp 110v
     
  16. Ryler

    Ryler

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    Complete nonsense.
    Our 110v machines sit in the corner gathering dust.
     
  17. Ryler

    Ryler

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    Its 2000 watts. Same as our 3 other 240v machines.
    Under powered junk basically and a waste of money.
     
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