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How easy is it to replace brake pads and discs?

Discussion in 'Car Repairs / Maintenance' started by nrglux, 31 Oct 2007.

  1. nrglux

    nrglux

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    Hi,
    I've limited mechanical knowledge (used a Haynes manual years ago).
    What tools would I need and how long would it take? My Seat Inca van was making a squeaking scraping noise when starting off and periodically when moving. A garage said its probably pads and discs worn to metal on metal. There is a bit of a thicker band at the edge beyond the pad contact. I was told a disc should only wear about 1mm? .They quoted £150 for pads and disc change. If I DIY would I need to use a Haynes etc manual for my van?
    Thanks
     
  2. ^neo^

    ^neo^

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    One of the easiest jobs to do on a car.

    Whip the wheel off, undo the 2 caliper bolts (7mm allen head) and remove caliper. Next undo the 2 M12 bolts which hold the caliper carrier on. Undo the retaining screw in the disc (which is probably siezed solid..... hammer and chisel to loosen it or impact driver if you have one) remove disc, and put it all back together.
     
  3. nrglux

    nrglux

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    Thanks for that. I may give it a go then.
    If I have trouble with a seized screw can anyone suggest a particular type of impact driver that is worth buying? (I could invest in something to keep as I would be saving almost £100 compared with Garage parts and labour)
     
  4. ^neo^

    ^neo^

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    You can get one from a motor factors for around a tenner. Just like a screwdrive that you clout with a hammer
     
  5. diyisfree

    diyisfree

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    The purpose of the locating screw is only to secure the disc to the hub to stop it dropping off whilest your fitting the wheel.

    If the screw is seized that bad, drill the head off and dont bother replacing it. Once the discs rust up a little they will seize to the hubs anyway thus re-securing themselves.
     
  6. empip

    empip

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    Ensure you clean up and deburr all disc and hub location faces, it doesn't take much in the way of rust or surface 'dings' to cause the disc to 'wobble' whilst rotating, this can have the effect of vibration and shifting pads and pistons slightly further from the disc - leading to possibly a 'longer feel' to pedal.
    -0-
     
  7. JohnD

    JohnD

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    changing pads is an easy DIY job; disks can be hard work, but it is surprisingly quick and cheap in one of the high street Tyres and Brakes chains. I wouldn't bother doing my own now.

    The price you were quoted sounds very fair but you can get some quotes if you want.

    You can use "original" parts or something like Brembo. A good fitter should replace any damaged screws anyway, and will be well equipped to get then out if seized.
     
  8. camel307

    camel307

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    Everyone makes it sound so simple.

    few bolts, few screws and jobs done lol......
    if u work like a monkey than yes!!! its that easy!!

    so what about undoing the bleed nipple before you push the piston back to prevent fluid from disturbing the seals in the slave/master cylinder???? And then bleeding the system after doing the brakes?

    Was there any mention of cleaning parts up and applying copper ease!!

    I suppose these are small oversites hey??? Keep up the wham bam jam approach and take your vehicles to a dealer to have the master cyclinders replaced!!!

    if you are going to do a job, do it properly. Particularly when brakes are quite important!!
     
  9. KingboyD

    KingboyD

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    In my life as a mechanic replacing probably thousands of discs and pads that has never happened :!:


    Dont get me wrong I do agree with some of what you are saying, everyone does make it sound easy but there can be alot more to it, are your supplied parts the right dimensions, what if bolts, discs or pads are seized solid in place! There can be alot more to brakes than you first think.
     
  10. ^neo^

    ^neo^

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    why would the hydraulic side need bleeding from just changing the discs and pads?
    Oh yeah i forgot, you were screwing around undoing bleed nipples........
     
  11. camel307

    camel307

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    You have not done much work on Vauxhalls then?? Very common for the seals to reverse, particularly on the older models.

    You honestly never undo the bleed nipple to push the piston back??? Just force it back??
     
  12. KingboyD

    KingboyD

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    Yes, lots of work on Vauxhalls, we have a few hundred on our fleet :) granted not older vauxhalls, Astra G and above, never had any problems.



    No I don`t, There is no forcing involved, when the brake pedal is released the hydraulic system is open, for instance if you simply open a bleed nipple fluid will easily flow from the reservoir to the nipple with out any external pressure/suction. If I have to undo the bleed nipple to push back the piston then I would think there was a problem somewhere.
     
  13. SteNova

    SteNova

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    i've never ever had a seal go wrong on a vaux, i had almost 50 novas from 1986 - 2006 never needed a master cylinder changing, but did loads of brake pad and disk changes, damm i even pushed back the pistons on the one i retro fitted with abs and willwoods :LOL:
     
  14. camel307

    camel307

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    It used to be a common prob on some of the vauxhalls...maybe not Nova.

    The seals are double lipped these days to prevent this happening but can still happen if you push/wind piston back too quick.

    Ask around and let me know if people heard of this

    I was always taught to undo nipple and clamp hose so no fluid moves upwards from caliper.

    Its never bad procedure to bleed anyway. standard part of procedure for me.
     
  15. gregers

    gregers

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    thats a bone of contention on the galaxy forum as well,1/2 reckon you should 1/2 dont.something to do with wrecking the abs system.
     
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