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How to paint staircase spindles?

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by devs, 9 Nov 2016.

  1. devs

    devs

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    Hi all, I've bought an uncompleted house that I'm going to finish and make my home.

    The original owners intention was to paint the spindles on the staircase. I just wondered if anyone had any tips on how this would be done and what type of paint should be used. I hate gloss so would like to avoid that.

    Many thanks,

    Devs.

    Q40A6220.jpg
     
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  3. Chud

    Chud

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    If it were me I'd be inclined to wipe them down with an oil or polyurethane (satin) finish - but I like the look of wood!
     
  4. devs

    devs

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    I know Chud, that has crossed my mind as I prefer the wood look to painted also. I've not been back to the house recently and am awaiting the keys. However I was under the impression that the spindle wood was inferior to what has been used on the banister etc as the intention was to paint. I'll take a closer look when I can.

    Just trying to get my long list of jobs in order ;)
     
  5. Chri5

    Chri5

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    Stay with the wood, zooming in tonthe picture the spindles seem fine.

    A paint finish does get chipped and will fade and thus need a routine recoat every 7-10 years.

    A nautural oil / stain wont need anywhere near the same work regime and the fading just looks natural.
     
  6. devs

    devs

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    Fair comments chaps, I'll stick with the wood! Cheers ;)
     
  7. misterhelpful

    misterhelpful

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    I agree with the others, and I like the look of that balustrade - it's plain and simple, which looks much more stylish than turned spindles these days. That wood is not the typical cheap 'knotty' pine that many use, which I would have recommended painting.
    Remember that it's easier to apply paint at a later date than it is to remove paint to get back to a wood finish.

    It appears there could be a few fillets missing from the underside of the handrail. If so, make sure you get the same timber to put in there, otherwise it will always stand out when oiled/waxed/stained.
     
  8. devs

    devs

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    Great advice mate and many thanks. What would people recommend that I finish the wood with. I seem to recall that everything had been finished other than the areas that they proposed to paint.

    I've attached a further image. The staircase is concrete with wooden clad. The areas that I marked in red I assume that these would need to be painted - I propose to paint this area white and wondered what paint I should use to avoid yellowing.

    Many thanks again all.

    Devs.
     

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  9. devs

    devs

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    anyone?
     
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  11. misterhelpful

    misterhelpful

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    It looks like MDF to me so painting it white is probably the best option as, although it can be stained to some extent, MDF never ends up looking like real wood.

    Use water based paints to guarantee a non-yellowing finish - a suitable primer followed by water-based satinwood would be preferable. As for a brand, I can't really recommend one available in the UK these days, as I don't use them here in Trumpland! :D
     
  12. Chud

    Chud

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    Re the areas of red I would give it a coat of Zinsser Bullseye 123 then whatever colour takes your fancy - you may even get away with what ever emulsion you use on the walls as that's a pretty large area to paint with wood paint...however as misterhelpful states (if you go for wood paint) you want to go with a water based one to avoid yellowing - I've recently tried the Armstead quick dry satinwood and to me it's miles better than the dulux equivalent.
     
  13. devs

    devs

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    Morning gents thats great advice and just what I wanted to know! Chud, I plan to use Diamond Matt in White on the walls. Would it be okay to apply over the Zinsser Bullseye?
     
  14. Chud

    Chud

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    Yep should be fine...if a bit pricey - dunno about trade prices but it's nearly twice as expensive as vinyl matt in my local Brewers!
     
  15. opps

    opps

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    I would be inclined to coat the timber with danish oil. It will soak into the wood and not be subject to chipping (unlike varnish).

    Word of warning tho'- if you use danish oil, do not scrunch up the cloths when you bin them. There is the risk of spontaneous combustion. I rinse mine in water and leave then laying flat outside over night.
     
  16. devs

    devs

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    Thanks guys, I've used Diamond Matt in my current house as I've got a couple of young kids that have a knack with white walls. Like you say the price is off putting and will be more so this time as the new house is pretty large at 4200sq ft.

    My next question would be if there is an alternative white paint that could be retouched without flashing? Or if I did take the Diamond Matt route would I be able to use a cheaper white paint on the ceiling without a noticeable difference?

    Cheers all, Devs ;)
     
  17. Chud

    Chud

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    Kids...yeah they can be hard on the walls!

    To be honest I've only used diamond matt in places like hallways and where there's a lot of contact with hands etc - everywhere else gets vinyl matt. I've found so long as its the same colour code and you let the two paints meet at a corner etc then you cant tell the difference between them - I'm painting in off-white's though, it may be more noticeable with darker/stronger colours but you should be fine with white.
     
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