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How to reshape copper pipe

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Passenger4, 17 Oct 2021.

  1. Passenger4

    Passenger4

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    Hi all bit of a dilemma.

    Cut a pipe with a multi tool as there was no room for a pipe slice or a hack saw. The pipe has gone oval shape for one reason or another.

    It's in a tight location (so can't use adjustable spanner to reshape) and access to the rest of the pipe is hidden in and would be messy to remove.

    I have had a look at a pipe swagging tool but don't know if this will work or will cause the pipe to become "thinner".

    Any tips will be appreciated.
     
  2. CBW

    CBW

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    A photo would help, so we know what room there is. Long nose pliers might work.
     
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  4. oldbuffer

    oldbuffer

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    Pipe swaging tool will be fine if:
    1. The lead in part is long enough to reshape the damaged end of the pipe.
    2. You can support sufficient of the pipe while hammering it in to avoid bending / buckling beyond the damaged section.
    If you go this route, try annealing the pipe (heat to red hot and quench or allow to cool) to soften it. Not a good idea if you are putting a compression fitting on it though as will be too easily crushed.
     
  5. Passenger4

    Passenger4

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    Doesn't pipe swagging thin the pipe at a certain section.

    It's an old pipe.

    Heat up the pipe before hammering in the swagging tool? Won't that make the tool stick to the pipe?
     
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  7. oldbuffer

    oldbuffer

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    1. It only thins the pipe if you insert the swage to full depth. The tip of the swage is the same outside diameter as the inside diameter of the pipe, and acts as a pilot. There then follows a tapered section before a wider section with its outside diameter equal to the outside diameter of the pipe. The taper and wider section of the swaging tool will stretch the pipe, and thus make a very small reduction in wall thickness.
    2. As noted above, annealing means heating the pipe to red hot then quenching it or allowing it to cool naturally. This softens the copper and makes swaging easier. You don't swage while hot. The fact that the copper is now softer makes using compression fittings more problematic, as the copper is easier to crush instead of resisting the compressive effect of the olive.
    3. I believe the process is swaging, not swagging.
    4. If you look at Toostation item 48296 it will give you a better idea of how it works.
     
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