Improving finish below DPC

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Hi,

Since we moved into our house we noticed the kitchen extension render is delaminated (80% +). Main reason seems to be because they rendered below the DPC as it’s a suspended floor with a cavity. The render below dpc was 100% delaminated to the extent I took most of it off with my bare hands! The last 2 inches of the render physically went into the ground which I can’t believe was done. I have let the wall dry out and cleaned it up as best I can; I have used a wire brush drill bit attachment and undiluted brick acid. It looks loads better but still an eyesore. I had a guy come round to quote for re doing the render above the dpc and he thinks the bricks used below dpc were not great because they are very smooth (almost like glass), he can’t comment on bricks above dpc as not taken render off yet but assumed to be the same.

He obviously won’t render below dpc and I wouldn’t want him to. My question is what can be done to change the aesthetics of the bricks below dpc? I would imagine bricks slips, cladding etc will all fail? Is the only alternative to do brick replacement with nicer looking engineering bricks? Pictures attached of current state.

Thanks for any advice offered.


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You can render below the dpc as long as you don't bridge it, normally with a bellcast bead. Either that paint it.
 
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You can render below the dpc as long as you don't bridge it, normally with a bellcast bead. Either that paint it.
Yeh but problem is that the dpc and bell cast bead for the main kitchen extension starts above the top course of bricks in those photos. So all these bricks are below dpc.
 
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Can you post a longer range shot showing the extension and house together?
That looks like a window ledge in the first and second photo's. If so then there is no way this can be below the house dpc unless the house is built on much higher ground. Either way, the house dpc should tie in with the extension dpc even if it means fitting a vertical dpc between each section of building. Can you also show a close up of the bottom 4-6 rows of the extension? The dpc should be at least 2 courses up, (150mm or 6"), from ground level to prevent splash back from paving stones after rainfall though you have gravel so you may get away with it being a bit closer.
 
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Can you post a longer range shot showing the extension and house together?
That looks like a window ledge in the first and second photo's. If so then there is no way this can be below the house dpc unless the house is built on much higher ground. Either way, the house dpc should tie in with the extension dpc even if it means fitting a vertical dpc between each section of building. Can you also show a close up of the bottom 4-6 rows of the extension? The dpc should be at least 2 courses up, (150mm or 6"), from ground level to prevent splash back from paving stones after rainfall though you have gravel so you may get away with it being a bit closer.
Yes you’re right that’s a window ledge. I didn’t really explain the set up very well apologies. The ledge belongs to a floor to ceiling window so that ledge is pretty much level with the kitchen floor. I have highlighted where I roughly think dpc is as per architect plans previous owners left which I also attach. Original house is over 200 years old so has no dpc. There is a cavity under the extension hence the drop. This cavity is in line with the cellar under the main house. Those air bricks from my first post are aligned with air bricks on the cellar wall the other side of the cavity directly opposite. The plans show dpc is right near bell bead which is pretty much level with kitchen floor and at the top of the bricks from last post. Thanks.



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Personally I'd clad that in uPVC colour matched to the windows, it can finish below the gravel without any wicking you might get from render. Ensuring the vents (presumably from a suspended floor further back) are maintained.
 
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not enough overhang on the cill.
Ok so this is what I as thinking. Would cement cladding work on everything from kitchen floor level and upward? Then re render lower part to a few courses above gravel then bitumen paint those last few courses?
 

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I can't see a DPC in your pic. Where do you think it is?


DON'T use bitumen paint.
 
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I can't see a DPC in your pic. Where do you think it is?


DON'T use bitumen paint.

The architect plans shows it’s under the bell bead - so around the level of the floor. Won’t see it until the upper render is removed I guess.

Why is bitumen paint bad?
 

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