Integrated appliance - choice of unfused plug on fised spur

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Currently, kitchen appliance sockets are fed from fused spurs above the worktop, but with kitchen refit, space behind appliances will be marginal for any plug and socket. If the socket is replaced with a flex outlet, I'd prefer to still have a break point in the cable to the appliance to make it easier to disconnect. What is the usual inline socket/plug type people use for this? I assume 15A round trailing socket and plug, or maybe even the 16A blue connectors.
 
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Currently, kitchen appliance sockets are fed from fused spurs above the worktop,
Not necessary.

but with kitchen refit, space behind appliances will be marginal for any plug and socket.
Other people seem to manage.

If the socket is replaced with a flex outlet, I'd prefer to still have a break point in the cable to the appliance to make it easier to disconnect.
Mmmm
What is the usual inline socket/plug type people use for this?
There isn't a usual. It's a daft idea.
I assume 15A round trailing socket and plug, or maybe even the 16A blue connectors.
Don't be silly. You're looking for problems that don't exist.

If you want a switch above the worktop then fit just a switch.
Fit normal sockets where there is room.
 
You can have a DP switch or a SFCU above the worktop, it can be quite handy and allows you to isolate the appliance easily for example if it goes wrong or there is a water leak.

And it is convenient to have an unswitched socket and an ordinary 13A plug beside or behind the appliance, under the worktop.

True, there is a fuse both in an ordinary plug and in the SFCU, but IME, appliance fuses blow approximately never unless there is a water leak, when you would probably have to drag the appliance out anyway, so no great hardship.
 
@EFLImpudence - I wouldn't be asking the question if there wasn't a problem. In this case, its a small galley kitchen with limited service space at the back. At the moment, the appliances are slot in - so the plugs buried behind aren't an issue. But when the kitchen is refitted and integrated ones go in (+ the layout is changing) they are going to be. OK, I could probably shift the sockets around so the plugs don't foul any of the pipes and stuff out of the appliances - but changing the sockets to flex outlets will give just enough extra space to solve the problem. Each socket is on its own fused (and switched) spur already - probably because this is an over 55s flat I'm doing out for the occupant, so they probably did it that way originally to allow things to be easily turned off by older folks.

@JohnD - unfortunately, the kitchen space is so ridiculously small (2.2M x 1.8M), there will be more appliances than base units (!) so there simply wont be anywhere more convenient to put them than behind. Agreed on the fuses.
 
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True, there is a fuse both in an ordinary plug and in the SFCU, but IME, appliance fuses blow approximately never ....
It's certainly quite unusual but the same will, of course, be true of the one in the SFCU ...
.... unless there is a water leak ...
I think it is extremely unlikley that a water leak would cause a 13A fuse to blow (or any other OPD to operate). As we've discussed before, it tales something like 22A, for a substantial period of time, to blow a 13A BS1362 fuse. An RCD, if present, would, of course, usually operate if water from a leak got 'into the electrics'.

Kind Regards, John
 
It's certainly quite unusual but the same will, of course, be true of the one in the SFCU ...
I think it is extremely unlikley that a water leak would cause a 13A fuse to blow (or any other OPD to operate). As we've discussed before, it tales something like 22A, for a substantial period of time, to blow a 13A BS1362 fuse. An RCD, if present, would, of course, usually operate if water from a leak got 'into the electrics'.

Kind Regards, John

Come to think of it, I don't think I've ever seen a fuse blow on an appliance. Had a few faults that have caused RCD trips though.

Clagged up powder draw on a washing machine. There was the tiniest trickle of water which tracked a full foot along the bottom of the control panel before making its way onto the electrics.

One of the relays on an oven control board having a melt down and leaving a high resistance path between mains side and the coil, blowing a path to earth through the control panel.

Neither would have resulted in more than a few hundred mA to earth.
 
You could consider using IEC connectors, e.g.
https://www.cricklewoodelectronics.com/Mains-Connectors-IEC-Euro.html
but I haven't the foggiest as to how practical this is and, I believe, they're rated at less than 13A (maybe 10A).

Thats a thought - you're correct, the more common one is usually 10A. But just remembered there is a 16A version of it you sometimes get on high current IT equipment and UPSs. Just checked and its a C19 / C20. That'll do if I go this route.
 
Come to think of it, I don't think I've ever seen a fuse blow on an appliance. Had a few faults that have caused RCD trips though.
Quite. Although there obviously are some things which could happen which would blow fuse (or cause an MCB to trip), they are very pretty rare events and, like you, I don't think I've ever experienced it with a large kitchen appliance.

Kind Regards, John
 
Some technicians will not ( or are not allowed to ) service a domestic appliance that is hard wired into an outlet. Being able to ensure full isolation by removing the plug from the socket is for them essential if they are going to work on the appliance.
 

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