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Internal Oak Doors

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by Jupiter01, 5 Dec 2016.

  1. SFK

    SFK

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    Jupiter,
    You asked, when I refer to Osma do I mean product 3060 as it is the only one recommended for doors.

    Nope, my rather contrary recommendation was to use "Osmo Polyx Oil, 3032, Satin, Clear" (which is recommended for Wooden Floors and Furniture) on Howden doors (which recommended you do not use this on their Veneer doors). My recommendation was based on the fact that I had used the 3032 on my floor, had lots left, got it from my local Brewers so could get more if I ran out halfway through, liked the finish on the floor, so have now used it on every wood surface that I can find. :>

    Actually, I never saw or used that product you found (3060) - although it looks like a good product perfect for your use. And if you are only doing doors, why not use it as it claims it has the same Satin/Clear finish as the one I used.

    sfk
     
    Last edited: 14 Dec 2016
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  3. Russ Marshall

    Russ Marshall

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    Apologies for not responding sooner. I too used the Polyx for floors. I used the Matt version on mine (3062). It does go a long way, as SFK said you only need to do really thin coats, and brush it out as far as you can. I too stressed about the advice not to use it on veneered doors but I had absolutely no problems.
     
  4. Jupiter01

    Jupiter01

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    ok...time to get these doors sorted. Thanks for your advice and I decided to purchase osmo. Can someone please provide a recommendation for a brush? Presumably I need a wider one for the raised parts and a smaller brush to get into the groove of the door?
     
  5. SFK

    SFK

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    Jupiter, I think you may be over worried about this. I find applying Osma much much easier than painting, and I realy do simply brush it on in thin coats with one paint brush.

    For the doors I used a 2inch brush (which is what I had and I was happy with) and simply pushed it into the small bits.
    You do need a brush that does not loose hairs.
    The trick is to not overload the brush and put too much on the door. Thin costs are best with Osmo. If you put too much on, simply brush it off.
    I do not clean the brush, but wrap it in a plastic bag (or the latex glove) and use again the next day for the next coat. Then throw away at end.

    sfk
     
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  6. Jupiter01

    Jupiter01

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    Thanks @SFK. Appreciate your comments on this and yes this has had me worried as I fear the prospect of getting this wrong and ruining the door. Thin is good so I will stick to that :)

    Did you sand in between coats?

    I've got 12 doors to do. Do you think half an hour per coat is a realistic estimation?

    Finally, how forgiving is Osmo if it finds its way on to the door furniture?

    Thanks again.
     
  7. SFK

    SFK

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    Jupiter,
    [If you are truly worried, have a go on a say 5 by 5cm hidden bit of your door now. Dip in brush, brush in a very thin bit on. Perhaps even dip your finger or some Kitchen Paper into the Osmo and rub it into the top edge of the door. Both will give you an idea of how it works and looks].


    Regarding ruining the door, as said I found it to be a very easy product and very hard to mess up. In reality I really did just slap it on (but very thinly). I dunked 0.5 to 1cm of the brush into the can, then painted that onto door from the top down in a relatively fast way. Then gave it a quick brush over again (with empty paint brush) just to ensure any collected bits/drips are brushed in. I recon/guess less than 20min to 30min to do a door (but that is 6hrs+coffee for you!).

    Best to try and keep it off Door furniture, but have some warm soapy water and a cloth at hand so that if you get it on Door furniture it can be wiped off straight away.

    I very lightly used wet and dry sand paper (using water) to sand the door once it was dry. I did this between coats. I used 600 or 1200 grit (http://www.toolstation.com/search?searchstr=39075 55247 41387 73854 99182 51476 36366)

    The biggest google complaint I have seen is people putting it on too think and it taking an age to dry. I saw one where they said they had put it on thick like varnish and it "never dried"!

    Again, I do find Osmo very simple and forgiving. If you have applied gloss to doors you will have no issues at all with this.
    sfk
     
    Last edited: 11 Jan 2017
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  8. endecotp

    endecotp

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    Are you not planning to remove the handles?
     
  9. Jupiter01

    Jupiter01

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    No not planning to remove all the furniture but I will have a damp cloth to hand.
    Finally, is there any need to sand at the start and before the first coat? If yes, what grade do you recommend for this given its a veneer door? I've noted the recommendation to use 600-1200 grit wet paper between coats.
     
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  11. sh4d0w

    sh4d0w

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    i tend to use this
    Ronseal UltraTough Matt Coat Clear Varnish
     
  12. SFK

    SFK

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    Jupiter,
    Was hoping someone else would answer incase they have better advice than my limited experience (several doors, a few floors, and some furniture).
    But for me I did not bother pre-sanding as I did not want the hassle of the dust.
    So osmo, wet and dry, and then osmo.(and sometimes wet and dry to make more Matt).
    Sfk
     
    Last edited: 2 Feb 2017
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  13. Jupiter01

    Jupiter01

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    Finished first coats on all doors. Looks terrific. Thanks for all the advice.
    I'm hoping that the second coat will be easier and consume less osmo?
     
  14. Although I haven't used the Osmo yet (looking to do some oak worktops) the odd thing I've found from the literature, is that you initially sand down the wood with 120-150 sandpaper, and that seems to help the oil soak in. Some of the instructions tell you to rub the coats in with a cloth to even it out, so best to read the instructions beforehand.
     
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  15. motorbiking

    motorbiking

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    i had no problem with danish oil. i hate varnish.
     
  16. SFK

    SFK

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    Jupiter,
    regarding "I'm hoping that the second coat will be easier and consume less osmo?",
    I tended to be very very light on the wet and Dry as I wanted to knock off some of the roughness, and keep as much osmo on the door. So for me it was a couple of passes of the wet and dry paper (more when I did a worktop and wanted a smoother finish). Then wiped it off with a clean cloth, and slapped on another layer. Regarding time, I think about the same, as same amount of door surface, faster as less brush resistance, but slower as easier to run. regarding amount of osmo, it goes further as wood now absorbs less.
    sfk
     
  17. Tigger90

    Tigger90

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    I use Osmo hard wax polyx oil for everything! Pitch pine doors, oak skirting, ash tv cabinet and oak furniture. It's so easy to use and does not have the awful varnish look! My neighbour put 12 coats of varnish on her doors, I swear she had to make the door openings bigger!!!
     

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