I've removed ivy, how do I get rid of the left over trigs

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I've removed ivy, how do I get rid of the left over trigs? See pic?
 

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mallyo, good evening.

How about a plastic rake, either a leaf rake used in Autumn, at ground level, a lawn or path Etc. or if you are able a set of ladders and a plastic hand rake, the type used for treating loos soil?

If you are up the ladder a hard set of gloves and brush off the easier to remove bits.

BUT! watch out for plastic coloured scrape marks on the brick, if possible avoid metal as this definitely will leave scrape marks

Ken.
 
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I have a brush that seems to be made from rubber. It has a yellow telescopic handle
Something like that should work

I believe that it's a JML Wonderbroom
 
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Plastic snow shovel used as a scraper would be better than a rake but test it doesn't leave marks first , it will come off easier if left as per Andys post.
 
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I did have it on the side of my house, I cut the stem where it came out of the ground and was advised to leave as long as possible. I did try to pull it off straight away but found it was pulling the mortar out of the wall. I just left it and it lost all of its strength/grip. One year later it nearly just fell off.

Andy
 

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If I may interject, I've heard that you shouldn't allow ivy to grow up under the eaves and possibly into the loft space. Is that the case and, if so, what damage would it do?
 
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If I may interject, I've heard that you shouldn't allow ivy to grow up under the eaves and possibly into the loft space. Is that the case and, if so, what damage would it do?
It is a good idea to keep it back - because like many plants, it starts tiny through gaps and can end up thick and pushing against timbers. Buddliea seeds are the worst, in brickwork
 
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I did have it on the side of my house, I cut the stem where it came out of the ground and was advised to leave as long as possible. I did try to pull it off straight away but found it was pulling the mortar out of the wall. I just left it and it lost all of its strength/grip. One year later it nearly just fell off.

Andy

I do the same. I cut off most of the volume for neatness, but the tiny feet will die, dry, shrivel and weather away. This is also less work and means you do not have to use a ladder.

BTW cut through all the stems near the ground and leave a clear space that you can see all round the house, as your first step, and immediately dab neat Glyphosate on all the freshly cut stems, with a small paintbrush, to kill them. If any still live, do it again after a month. Weedkiller on the leaves is ineffective because they are waxy and not absorbent.

If you leave any of the stems alive, it will continue to grow and you will have to do it again. Tidying up the dead stuff is just for appearance and there is no hurry.
 

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It is a good idea to keep it back - because like many plants, it starts tiny through gaps and can end up thick and pushing against timbers. Buddliea seeds are the worst, in brickwork
Thanks.
I have been cutting the stems as they approach the gutter. Anything above just dies off.
Fortunately, we live in a bungalow and it is easy to reach that high without a ladder.
In the past, it has been left to grow, but I have never seen it invading the gutter. I was more concerned as to what it would do inside the loft. I was assuming that as there is very little daylight in there anything inside would not thrive, but if it could damage the timbers then that would need me to take action.
No problem with the brickwork, though, as the walls have been rendered all the way up and it seems to be in good condition.
Thanks for your advice.
 
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It wouldn't be strong enough to shift roof timbers but could push against the soffit and fascia. If it's cut and died it'll be fine.
 
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