kitchen square mitre and cornice

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Im doing a kitchen refit. I got square edged 40mm worktops from a big shed. Two will meet in a corner. What's best way to join. Butting them together or a mitre joint. . Does biscuits and bolts still need to be used if butting. I know you can get metal bits that slides between the two . Does this get glued.
I have loaded pic of worktop

Also got cornice to fit. Would it be better to use machine or box..

Are handle jigs worth it for cabinet door handles
 

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If you are going to mitre you need a jig and 1/2" router. If your skills are not up to it you can butt with joint strips but not a nice finish .Cornice needs a good accurate cut so hand mitre saw or chop saw. Handles are easy enough to position , you can make up a small template for accuracy.
 
Thanks. Think I will hire a jig and router from hss hire (35) a day. I don't like the look of the strip that buts together. Ive watched some youtube videos on how to do it (they make it look easy) . I read you go 50 mm over and then do a Mason mitre and a fem one on other length and should slot together does it being square pose any problems. Do I need biscuits or can I get away with just bolts. Will need to get a new circular saw blade . And wood for a home made rail. .
 
Given the cost of replacing the worktops immediately if it goes wrong, or soon afterwards if you have a poor joint that allows water ingress, this is one job I would get a pro in for, with all the right tools.

B&Q have handle templates for a couple of quid in sheet plastic, I doubt they are as good as a proper jig especially if your doors have soft contoured edges which are harder to line up to.
 
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Being a square edge, you would normally butt joint it, but as it has a laminate edging stuck on the front, you'll need to treat is as a post formed worktop, and use a Jig. Using biscuits is always best, as the joint can move as you tighten the bolts up. I can't remember than name of the stuff, but you can get coloured glues that are waterfast, and act as a joint filer as well. For the cornices, you need a fine tooth blade on a compound mitre saw = about £50 from screwfix this weekend if you haven't got one, but at what point does it get cheaper to get a pro in to do it if you haven't got all the tools you need.
 

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