1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Kitchen worktop - recommended sanding grade

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by DeusXM, 22 Oct 2020.

  1. DeusXM

    DeusXM

    Joined:
    29 Jul 2019
    Messages:
    38
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I'm looking to refresh my existing kitchen oiled wood worktops.

    At present, they're 'textured' i.e if you run your hand over them, you can lightly feel the woodgrain. I'd like to get them so that once they've been fully reoiled, they're smooth to the touch.

    I've read conflicting advice as to the sanding grade recommended. Some sources talk about starting at 120 as the initial finish and then going up to much higher. Others say that once you go over 180, the surface becomes too fine for the oil to penetrate properly.

    My plan was to sand down initially with an orbital sander at 120 and then do final tidying by hand if essential. With that in mind, can anyone help advise to what grade I should use for both the orbital and hand please?
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. Notch7

    Notch7

    Joined:
    15 Sep 2017
    Messages:
    24,729
    Thanks Received:
    1,760
    Location:
    S. Uplands
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    if they are badly scratched you might want to start at 80 grit

    then go down to 120 grit, maybe 180 if you can still see orbital scratch marks

    if they are "textured" id be guessing the worktops are oak -as its ring porous and quite course.

    Im not sure you will get "texture" from just an orbital -you might need a wire brush or webrax disc
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. DeusXM

    DeusXM

    Joined:
    29 Jul 2019
    Messages:
    38
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks - I'm guessing then the bits I've read about using 320 grit paper are wrong then?
     
  5. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    6,080
    Thanks Received:
    1,346
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    It all depends on the species. With open pore timbers such as oak and ash you generally won't get much benefit by going above P120 grit as the coarseness of the timber grain cancels out the effect of the finer sanding. On smooth, closed pore timbers such as sycamore, maple, beech, mahogany, etc you will get a far better finish by working up through the grits to P240 or even P320. Of coarse (sic) for the best surface finish you should forego sanding and hand scrape with a cabinet scraper
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  6. SFK

    SFK

    Joined:
    23 Jul 2010
    Messages:
    1,945
    Thanks Received:
    451
    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I have done all the above (typically down to 240 grit), and then flattened it further AFTER first coat of osmo.
    I let osmo dry and then lightly used 1000 wet-and-dry (with water).
    Before applying second coat of osmo.
    SFK
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Sponsored Links
  8. DeusXM

    DeusXM

    Joined:
    29 Jul 2019
    Messages:
    38
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks all.

    Next possibly very stupid question. I'll be using a Bosch consumer-grade (ie green, not blue) sander. With the right adaptor, can I hook this up to a standard domestic Dyson vacuum, or would this likely destroy the vacuum?
     
  9. conny

    conny

    Joined:
    30 Jun 2008
    Messages:
    14,002
    Thanks Received:
    785
    Location:
    Suffolk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Shouldn't do the vacuum any harm and will certainly be beneficial for your lungs and anyone else in the vicinity.
    Best rule of thumb is to remember, machines and fixtures can be replaced, your health can't be.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  10. rick1632

    rick1632

    Joined:
    23 Jun 2020
    Messages:
    53
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The Dyson will be fine - just wash the filter afterwards and make sure you don't over fill the bin!
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  11. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page