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Leak...what would insurance fix?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by MrMrMr111, 18 Aug 2019.

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  1. MrMrMr111

    MrMrMr111

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    I have a leak from shower, the leak comes out on the ceiling though, so it's damaged the plasterboard ceiling.

    I presume there is a pipe running from the showeraomg this ceiling and so the leak could be anywhere from shower onwards.

    I've confirmed the tray is ok, and resealed again, looked under the tray and all seems dry. So it's either the very back of the tap which is also filed around, or some pipe underneath that I can't see.

    So my question is, if I reported this to insurance, what would they do. I mean do they repair leak and everything else they damage for access, eg ceiling, tiles, shower tray etc?

    Never done a claim but it would be no good getting access fixing a leaky joint and then have to do other repairs myself or another trader to fix at cost to me.

    If they don't then I may as well just have a look, but I don't want to start and then phone them if have to later.

    Thanks
     
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  3. Madrab

    Madrab

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    Check your building insurance cover docs. A lot of standard cover is called trace and access and usually covers the costs of getting to the leak and making good.

    The cost of actually repairing the leak and the damage the leak caused directly is usually down to the customer.
     
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  4. MrMrMr111

    MrMrMr111

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    Ah ok never heard of that thanks, I'll have a look.

    That's a bit harsh if so though, basically they can damage as much as want to get too leak and then you have the extra cost afterwards to fix!

    Potentially in this case he could rip my ceiling down, not find, rip tiles off shower, find leak, fix it and then leave the files and ceiling to fix myself?

    mmmm
     
  5. FiremanT

    FiremanT

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    I think, normally, the damage is covered, but not the actual fault. Having said that, my Direct Line renewal has just come through, with a list of amendments, and I think one was removing the trace and access. But that might be my imagination, I will have to look at it properly. What has definitely been removed is the "replacement of sets" cover. Which means if my AquaMarine bathroom suite gets damaged, I will be gong multi colour ;)
     
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  6. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    So not much left, that is actually covered by the insurance?
     
  7. Madrab

    Madrab

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    Anything that's damaged to get to the leak will be covered, burst walls, floors etc by the trades getting to the leak location.

    Anything that was water damaged by the leak but hasn't been damaged by the tradesmen to get to the leak usually isn't covered. So say a leak through a ceiling that has ruined the floor below, it would cover the ceiling repair costs if that needed pulled down to get to the leak but not the damaged floor, of course that may be subsequently covered by another part of the policy. It is down to the wording, always best to read exactly what's covered.

    Some policies do have all inclusive too.
     
  8. ianmcd

    ianmcd

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    As already said all insurance policies are different, there is no , one fit for all, call them up and ask what they would suggest
     
  9. MrMrMr111

    MrMrMr111

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    How can the actual fault not be covered? This is the cause and so I'd expect it to be surely?

    It's a can of worms really. I'd, probably by sounds of it wrongly, presumed getting to a leak and fixing everything damaged by it would be covered.

    I'm with Direct Line, will have to see what cover is, phoning and asking though you are then commited and told them about it so would be logged expect if you go ahead or not with the claim?
     

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  11. FiremanT

    FiremanT

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    Because it is insurance not a home maintenance scheme. So if, say, a pump leaks, that is in itself not covered. But the damaged ceiling would be. Presumably, if the water dropped into an electrical component then that would be covered.
     
  12. FiremanT

    FiremanT

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    Unless things have changed drastically over the last ew years, that is wrong. The failure is not covered but the ensuing damage is.


    Under your hypothesis, a pump could (and I know I am stretching here, but the point is valid) seize, overheat set fire to the airing cupboard and burn the whole terrace down - and no one is covered under the insurance?
     
  13. KenGMac

    KenGMac

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    MrMrMr111, good afternoon.

    OK I work as an Insurance Surveyor.

    As posted there are several differences as to what is covered by various Insurers, same "basic Rules" but a difference of interpretation of the rules??

    1/. Trace and access, if your policy has that as an "add on" The Insurer will pick up the cost of exactly that, at times the insurer will allow up to £ 5,000 other insurers will not go that far, it means that yes there is a leak [somewhere] in a wall behind the shower, T/Access will allow for the cost of ripping out the shower [whatever] to access the source of the leak. Then under the same clause it will allow for the replacement of the areas damaged during the T/Access.
    If the T/Access £££ is not enough, the "normal" insurance cover should kick in. what the Insurer needs to know is what was the actual causation of the damage, where was the leak emanating from?

    2/. OK say the plasterboard ceiling is totally shot with water damage, and at the same time the solid wood floor in the Kitchen has been damaged, all Insurers will replace both elements, because they have both been damaged by the same "Event" this can and at times does extend to the kick plates on the Kitchen base units.

    3/. Now the "thorny one" the damage repair costs will be covered by the Insurer, but the actual £ 2.50 elbow in the pipework is not [notionally] covered, in practice unless the component is extortionately expensive to replace this tends to be ignored?? I have seen top down escapes of water from a cold water tank in a loft, the 2/3 floors of the property badly damaged to the extent of several dozens of thousands of £££ but the component that failed costs as above less than £ 5.00
    OK Why is it thus?? The insurer can take the stance that the [failed] component elbow or what ever has failed because of old age, and / or wear and tear, both of the latter are very specific exclusions in All Policies.

    All in all a somewhat confusing state of affairs?

    Now, another area of a Policy? if your Policy has what is called an "all risks" section added in which there is a mention of "Accidental Damage" this will add to your cover.

    Bottom line is consider at the next renewal getting both T/Access + A/Damage clauses added if they are not in place now?

    If you make an Insurance claim next years premium will rise, I have heard of some Insurers who will raise the next years premium if you phone them for some advice??? why because these insurers consider that you have considered to intimate a claim and as such the exposure to "Risk" by the Insurer has risen?? must say I do not agree with the latter at all.

    Ken.
    Where things get blurred is if that expensive solid wood floor extends to other rooms and there are no threshold bars below the doors??? some Insurers will replace all of the expensive solid wood floors, others will "introduce" a threshold bar below a door and replace only the area of solid floor in the Kitchen. Depends on the Insurer.

    As a basic "concept" to which all Insurers adhere is that the claimant will be put back in a position that they were in before the "event" [leak] damaged the property, proviso here is that the Policy Holder will not be put back in a better position than before the event, meaning the Insurer will not pay for gold plated taps in place of the original shiny chrome ones??
     
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  14. dilalio

    dilalio

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    Had it many times... Usually (with a good insurer) everything is covered (within reason) except the part that failed, which is usually the least expensive item.
    Have had the threshold bar issue raised before but customer(s) have been able to argue that point.
    My advice is that once you've made a claim then monitor your renewal premium and buy elsewhere if they try and significantly up it... Seems like punishment for claiming something you are entitled to... Hate this aspect of insurance... everything comes with a risk when you run a business and generally, they are on the winning side of a calculated gamble.
     
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  15. KenGMac

    KenGMac

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    One other thing to consider?

    Who actually undertakes the repairs needed?

    Insurer will try very, very hard to get you to accept a so called Cash Settlement, that is a "Full and Final settlement" of your claim and that is all that the Insurer will offer you even if or your contractors discover other damage not easily visible??

    If you consider things, get the Insurer to send in one of the Insurers preferred contractors, why, you avoid the above scenario, and if the Contractor is not functioning as intended it is the Insurer that has to sort it out?? finally you will get some sort of a guarantee from the Contractor backed by the Insurer if within 3 or 6 Months something goes wrong with the repair. If you take the cash settlement, bluntly you are on your own???

    Ken.
     
  16. KenGMac
    Blimey ken,you have been here a long while and your still not a qualified trades person but you make outrageous comments in a way to accept revenue.

    ken,hows the free advertising going (y)

    fecking ambulance chaser on line.
     
  17. Maybe diynot can consider a new forum for ambulance chasers :LOL:
     
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