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Loft raised floor DIY method?

Discussion in 'Floors, Stairs and Lofts' started by bmouthboyo, 14 Feb 2020 at 11:29 AM.

  1. bmouthboyo

    bmouthboyo

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    Hi guys,

    Looking to re-insulate my attic and would like to give the new insulation more depth for better heat retention in the bungalow.

    I will need to raise an area for storage however the kits you seem to be able to buy online with aluminium legs to raise the new subfloor are very expensive. Anyone know of a guide to a cheaper DIY method? Happy to knock something together with wood, chop saw, screws etc.
     
  2. plastic_peanut

    plastic_peanut

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    Loft legs are around £2.00 each. Depends on the size of the area but price up the loft boards and legs then compare it to the loft zone kit
     
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  4. JohnD

    JohnD

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    You can run new timbers as if "joists" at right angles to the existing. This will give you double the depth to put insulation in. When screwed down skew at every junction, and preferably with a ply floor screwed down on top, it spreads the load and gives a rigid deck that will withstand you walking about and stacking meterials on without the ceilings below cracking so much, better than the loft legs.

    I used decking boards, on edge, that I was able to get at a good price. I'd use a wood preserver as you don't want woodworm in the roof.

    It does not increase the total overall strength of the loft floor, so no grand pianos or parties.
     
  5. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    I used osb cut by b&q into 8" strips. 8 feet long
    Then added 2x1 on each side top and bottom.
    This allowed me to screw to the existing joists, and alter the spacing so the joints in the chipboard flooring and insulation matched.
    The original spacing of the old joists meant that insulation on rolls had to be trimmed and modern loft panels didn't match the joists
     
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  7. tony1851

    tony1851

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    If you screwed the new joists directly on top and in line with the existing joists (screws would need to be in countersunk holes) you would get an even stiffer floor.
     
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