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Low profile socket behind wall mount TV

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by mr_chaela, 17 Apr 2019.

  1. mr_chaela

    mr_chaela

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    Looking for a low profile solution to power a wall mount TV.
    An FCU/Cable Outlet not really suitable as TV has a fixed power lead and would be pain to connect/disconnect.

    Could an MK 995 clock connector be used. MK do not specify the rating of the connector but simply say it is fitted with 2A fuse. The TV has a 3A fuse.

    Any ideas would be appreciated.
     
  2. AndyPRK

    AndyPRK

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    I don;t see why not.

    Personally I used a legrand slimline socket. (other sockets are available). I fitted it within the boarder of the TV after lots of measuring, the height was ok.
    I left 1/3 of the socket outside of the TV edge so that I could get to the on/off switch easily.

    This was a 2012 panasonic tv
     
  3. OwainDIYer

    OwainDIYer

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  4. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I don't know where I got them (a very long time ago), who made them, whether they are still available and whether they are/were fully (if at all!) BS1363-compliant, but in a few places around my house (where, like you, space is limited) I have used 'ultra-slim' 13A plugs, plugged into standard (could be 'flat plate', these days) 13A sockets - it might be worth looking to see if they still exist.

    Another approach I've taken in a couple places, in situations similar to yours, is to recess a standard 13A socket into the wall, so that a standard 13A plug does not protrude beyond wall level when plugged in.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  5. AndyPRK

    AndyPRK

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    Are those the plugs with 2 screws to hold on the cover?
     
  6. FrodoOne

    FrodoOne

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  7. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Not that I've personally ever seen - although, as I wrote, it's something which I have been k nown to improvise! I imagine that the 'ridiculous price' reflects the perceived very small size of the potential market (so small, they no-one seems to try, at any price, in the UK!)
    Bunnings foray into the UK was amazingly short-lived :)

    Kind Regards, John
     
  8. FrodoOne

    FrodoOne

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    Perhaps you did not understand that which I was trying to convey. (The foray of Bunnings into the UK market is immaterial in this regard.)
    Recessed mountings for Socket Outlets (and other devices of similar "standard" size) are available in Australia [and in North America]).
    My question was "are they not so available in the UK" and, if not, why not?

    While the "market" may be seen as very small (reflecting the high price for the devices concerned) this market does exist, the devices are there (in some countries) so, why should the UK be an outlier, with any such mounting/device not being readily available in that country?
     
  9. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I fully understood 'what you were trying to convey' - and, as you are aware, my responses were that (a) I am personally not aware of such products in the UK and (b) that I suspect the reason for this may be a (correctly or incorrectly) perceived very small market.
    Beyond what I've already said, your guess is as good as mine.

    On thinking a little, one possible explanation is that, unlike plugs used in many other countries, the cable exits a UK (BS1363) plug at right angles to the pins (i.e. usually 'parallel to the wall'), so the vertical extent of the recess would have to be pretty large to avoid an unacceptably sharp bend where the cable existed from a recessed plug. The recess would also have to be quite wide (horizontally) because of the width of UK plugs (and the need to get fingers down the sides of them to pull them out) ... so maybe they would require such a large recess that it is not felt that they would be aesthetically acceptable?

    Kind Regards, John
     
  10. FrodoOne

    FrodoOne

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    Thereby is (perhaps) a design fault in UK plugs demonstrated by your response - since many plugs in other countries are designed to overcome this deficiency, small though any market maybe.

    (The apparently strict requirement that the cable exits vertically downwards from a UK Plug is an obvious example, and I do realise that it is necessary for the required fuse to be located somewhere - which is unnecessary for electrical plugs in most other jurisdictions.)

    Please do look at some of the many plugs and socket outlets shown in https://www.plugsocketmuseum.nl/Overview.html
     
  11. JohnD

    JohnD

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    They were specified that way to prevent people yanking them out of sockets by hauling on the cable.
     
  12. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    There's really no point in talking about 'design faults' in UK plugs, because they are what we have, and they are not going to change, or 'go away' any decade soon!

    As you observe, one of the issues is the need to accommodate a fuse in a UK plug, and changing that is even less likely to happen 'any decade soon', since it would require a total re-think of UK wiring practices, as well as the design of plugs & sockets!

    Kind Regards, John
     
  13. OwainDIYer

    OwainDIYer

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    It is not a deficiency; it is a design attribute making it difficult (so people don't try) to unplug an appliance by yanking the flex, and facilitates a proper cord grip. We used to have rear-entry plugs (2 pin 5 amp); and shaver plugs are usually still rear-entry.
     
  14. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Perhaps a recessed box isn't necessary in the UK - or Europe.

    A moulded UK plug is only ¾ of an inch deep.

    A schuko plug with flex exiting parallel to the wall when inserted is about the same.

    A plug with the flex exiting in line with the pins would be considerably more.
     
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  15. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    ... true, but I suppose the point is that (rarely - hence the 'very small market') it does become 'necessary' if one doesn't have ¾" to play with!

    Kind Regards, John
     
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