Low voltage garden lights

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Hi, I have a light setup in my garden which I have had for a number of years, the company who originally sold them was called Selecta light, it’s a modular system, you have a Power supply big enough to cover the amount of lights you have (I currently have 4) then you buy the amount of cable you need and then the lights connect to the main cable with a screw in type connector that pierces the cable. I also have a dusk till dawn sensor so the lights activate automatically.

The system is brilliant and has been a good buy but I want to extend and they no longer have a web site, can I just connect any 12V lights to the system and they will work?

I have included a picture of my power supply, the cable has SCT-2 written on it.
 

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Not familiar with this system, will have to bow to others' knowledge
 
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You said low voltage. Mains is low voltage. You said 12 volts. 12 volts is extra low voltage.

No reason extra 12 volt lights can’t be added as long as the total does not exceed the rating of the power supply which is shown as 150VA.
 
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You said low voltage. Mains is low voltage. You said 12 volts. 12 volts is extra low voltage.
If you really want to confuse the OP, you might add that, in the eyes of the IEC electrotechnical dictionary 12 volts is also Low Voltage, as well as being Extra Low Voltage.

We know that he's talking about 12 volts, and that's all that matters.
 
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If you really want to confuse the OP, you might add that, in the eyes of the IEC electrotechnical dictionary 12 volts is also Low Voltage, as well as being Extra Low Voltage.

We know that he's talking about 12 volts, and that's all that matters.
No, just enlighten him/her. We know it is 12 volts as that was stated. Correct terms are important for safety.
 
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Hi, I have a light setup in my garden which I have had for a number of years, the company who originally sold them was called Selecta light, it’s a modular system, you have a Power supply big enough to cover the amount of lights you have (I currently have 4) then you buy the amount of cable you need and then the lights connect to the main cable with a screw in type connector that pierces the cable. I also have a dusk till dawn sensor so the lights activate automatically.

The system is brilliant and has been a good buy but I want to extend and they no longer have a web site, can I just connect any 12V lights to the system and they will work?

I have included a picture of my power supply, the cable has SCT-2 written on it.
To actually give an answer to your question:-
The output of the Power Supply is 12 V AC, so any lights connected, up to the maximum of 150 VA (Roughly speaking, 150 W),
must work on AC
If you use LEDs (which would be a good idea) the DC LED lamps must include a Bridge Rectifier. - in order to work on the AC supply.
 
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Possibly not. But it is what it is.
You can have it either in English of French ...
1657542455381.png


If you regarded this is 'incorrect', then I would have to wonder what it is that qualifies you to question a definition produced by such an international organisation. The IEC clearly regard "ELV" as being a subset of LV, not a mutually-exclusive range.
 
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I have used these in my garden MR16 garden spike lights: https://amzn.to/2KWN1zV but you need to buy the lamp for them so nothing to stop you using 12V halogen. You will need waterproof junction boxes
Techmar do some plug and play type lights that might be suitable
 

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Con,
As Frodo One said, you need 12V ac lights.
And you you need to add up the Wattage of each light that you connect and ensure the total is less than say 150Watts if they are incadencent (old style) lights, or less than 75W if LED lights.

Some questions for you that might help us all:
1) What type of lights or bulbs are you using now (Incadecemnt or LED)?

2) Do the lights say what their wattage is (might say 50W or 5W or some other number followed by a W).

3) What style of bulb do you want? (Spot, uplighter, patio)

4) Can you wire it yourself, or do you need it with a proper wire coming out of the back?


As an example these spotlights would work for you (12V, ac, LED and 3W), but you need to wire them to your current system:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Light-Garden-Flood-Spotlight-Waterproof/dp/B07L7XQ2GK
or
there are these that would work for you (12V, ac, LED and 3W)

SFK
 
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I was surprised to see no minimum output. I replaced all my 50W quartz with 5 watt LED but the power supply was clearly wire wound, I have found MR16 bulbs rarely say AC, however they often say 50/60 Hz which means they are AC.

I fitted cheap pound world 0.58 watt 12 volt G5.3 lights into the bathroom pods, basic reason was not needed but looked bad with no light, they did not last long, I would assume they did not like the AC, they clearly have to have a rectifier in them, as you can fit a G5.3 lamp either way around, these were replace with cheap lidi which said 50 Hz and no further problems.

I would think 90% of high street G5.3 are for AC, however some specialist firms do DC versions, mainly for caravans and boats, they are normally more expensive with a voltage range of 10 - 30 volt, unlikely to pick up in error.

In the main had to find LED over 10 watt, so can likely stretch to 15 lamps.

It seems they are made with different badges see this report seems a Dutch company, but Ring has been well known for auto electrics.
 
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... other than that (in addition to energy consumption issues) the OP's 150 VA power supply would not be adequate for very many halogens!

Kind Regards, John
This was something I looked at years ago before I bought the LED lights recently. I currently have 4-off 5W LED spike lights with a 50W LED driver with the intention of adding another 4 lights to the setup giving a total of about 40W. The same using halogen would need some hefty transformers!
I did wonder about the OP's setup and I expect the existing to be fairly low wattage lamps to be using a 150VA transformer
 

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